The Changes since the 80s and the war in Eastern Ukraine

Transition Dialogue Panel on the Conflict in Eastern Ukraine

9. November 2016 at Böll-Foundation Berlin, DRA Autumn Talks on Conflict Resolution in the Donbass Region

The war in Eastern Ukraine widely disappeared from from press coverage and international notice. But the conflict goes on and the Minsk peace process is shaky. After discussing prospects for conflict resolution for two days, this panel tried to shed some light on the issue of transition experience as a factor in the conflict in the Donbass.

Indeed, thesis and sides taken by theherbstgesprache-1 panellists and audience happened to present the conflict setting in a nutshell. A heated discussion revealed the long shadows of the past.

Igor Semivolos from the Crisis Media Center Kiev argued there was a certain mind set of Donbass people that triggered this conflict: Firstly, because the Soviet culture was mainly a culture of violence with its emphasis on the eternal struggle of communism against its enemies. Secondly, the Donbass was suffering from a cultural poverty. People there preserve the “paternalist attitude that someone will do it better for them”, say Semivolos. Individual identity was not welcome here, there was still a culture of collectivism. In this region, that is the ‘most Russian one’ of all Ukraine regions, there were social tensions before the conflict broke out.

Valentina Cherevatenko, Union of the Don Women, lives in a Russian region close to the Ukraine boarder. Here, it happens that one part of the village is Russian and one part is Ukraine.

We had a clear picture from films of who is the enemy, she remembers her childhood in the Soviet Union. The problem is, that certain “buzzwords” proof to be longlasting and are reframed and reused in the current conflict – without reflecting what we are actually talking about. “If you told me, what you understand with fascism, I can tell you, if we have it or not”, says Cherevatenko.

“Everything we experience today is related to the way that history is presented to us.” We must talk to each other, we must understand what we mean with the words we use. “Future needs remembrance and remembrance needs future.” Valentina Cherevatenko

The audience of about 50 people was eager to contribute to the discussion, as for instance Valentina from Ukraine remembered, “When I was in the first grade my belief was that I would live in Communism forever. But then the Soviet Union collapsed.” Especially for history teachers the situation was difficult: history was rewritten and changed, and now herbstgesprache-4a completely different history was teached.

Then a competition of history startet with the election of Juschtschenko and goes on since then, she says. “In the region where I live, the situation after Maidan was not accepted, it was not just in the Donbass.” She remembered the summer of 2014 as a moment of breakdown of public infrastructure, that people could only manage because of mutual collective help organised by citizens.

Olena Pravylo from the Congress of Cultural Activists took a different stand: “As a person who was on the Maidan from the first day, I can say, that there are obviously different positions. But I don’t want to argue to about this.”

Instead she drew the attention on the research and interviews she did as part of the Transition Dialogue network. From the research, she understood that the different generations have a very different remembrance and perspective on history.

“My generation – in 1991 we were children. For us Tschernobyl meant vacation.” After the explosion, many people were moved to different regions to escape the radio-active pollution. “But the interviewed people born in the 70s and 60s said: We were born and went to school as Soviet Children. After the Soviet Union was just banditism. They say, the best time was only after 2000 when things finally stabilised”, she recalls from her research. Transition doesn’t end. “What we need is a transition generation dialogue, to discover how differently we understand history.”herbstgesprache-3

She referred to the resume from research done in Germany, suggesting a role swith between children (born in the 80s) and their parents. “The children understood new rules of the game. But the parents still live in the past, they did not manage to adjust to he changes and find their position.”

“The boarder of Soviet thinking is moving eastwards but it is still there”, says Olena Pravylo. “Through the Transition Dialogue network, I understand that there are many Russian people who want a dialogue, who want to question the patterns of thinking and overcome the conflict.”

“I am happy we have now changes in Ukraine after Maidan. Let’s see, were it leads. I liked the answer of a person I asked, how he would understand that transition ends: He said, ‘then clerks in public service will smile like normal people’.” Olena Pravylo

Aleksei Tokarev from MIGMO University switched the topic saying he wants to address the stereotypes. “I try to tear down this wall.” He said, he would not deny that Russian troops went to Ukraine twice. But “it’s the problem of Europe that they think, the problems lie only in Moscow.” He insisted the voice of people in the Donbass wasn’t heard. Far not everyone there would agree to the politics in Kiev.

Here the question, if the conflict in the Ukraine was a civil or international war was on the table again. “It has both elements”, says Igor Semyvolos. “It’s also a civil conflict.” After collapse of Soviet Union, people in the Donbass had not developed a new common identity like most people in Western Ukraine. As the conflict was triggered, they were in the midst, “forced to take side between Ukraine and Russia”.

Voices from the audience jumped back on the issue of transition: “The transition from communist time hasn’t finished, and that is the reason for this conflict”, one woman said. She quoted the artist Dragovic’s: ‘how to lead into conflict in three easy steps’: First; raise level of acceptance for violence in society – e.g. activists were confronted in a cruel way, that was to serve this purpose. Second, create stereotypes – first victim of war is truth.

Another women said, “we grew up having been teached, that Ukraine identity would not exist if it wasn’t defended with blood. It’s a culture of self-defence. But it is not one of tolerance. So you in Germany do not understand: How could you support a war? But that is why.”

“We need to ask ourselves who we are? We are children of Soviet union and live now 20 years without identification.” Statement from the audience

The discussion showed that issues of identity arising of the break up of Soviet Union and ongoing instability indeed contribute to the conflict setting in the Donbass. Mental lines of conflict run deep through the population within the Ukraine and and beyond, they are not only between regions but also generations.

Actually, narratives of the past long before the break up of the Soviet Union are framing and impacting on the attitude to the Ukraine state and the Donbass conflict now. Also in this discussion participants called on historical events and actors – like the 2. World War – to make their point. As stressed by panelists and audience, it would need a lot more dialogue to sharpen the senses for the fact that there are different perspectives on history and the current conflict in the Donbass. Indeed, when people find it hard to talk to each other, is is probably the clearest sign that they should talk.

herbstgesprache-2

Breaking the Silence: Memories of the Times of Change

As different as the transition experience was among people in the same country (let alone among the three countries), most interviews reveal a similar crucial experience of lasting impact: loss of trust, rules or orientation // Findings from inter-Generation Talks and Interviews with the “Children of Change” from Ukraine, Russia and Germany

img_3150

As Transition Dialogue-Network, we are taking a narrative approach, looking on how people individually remember, how they reflect on the past, and the impact of transition on their life. We let people tell their story and try to map a vivid picture of transition experience in Eastern Europe in comparative perspective.  Activities include a series of interviews in Germany, Russia and Ukraine. A focus is on the “children of change” those who experienced transition from the late 1980s in childhood or teenage time.

The years of change turned out to be a lasting point of reference for people’s life and thinking. This frame of reference is a set of often unreflected narratives, reshaped memories, for younger people partly second hand. These narratives have a great impact on people’s self-image and attitude towards society. They must be revealed to understand what makes citizens become a driver of change – and what not. Also, civic education need to deal with how people actually perceive society and democracy, rather then solely teaching them about it.

We had dozens of guided interviews with participants of the Wendekinder (30-40 years old) and the parent generation (50-70 years old) old. In the German case also interviews between parents and their actual children.

This is what we learnt from the interviews in the differnet countries

UKRAINE

TRANSITION MOMENT The answers are split: Some named the fall of the Soviet Union and Ukraine independence in 1991 as starting point, others Gorbachov’s “Perestroika”.  Notably the Chernobyl tragedy 1986 is seen as a powerful symbol of erosion of the Soviet system, because people stopped trusting the government: they were not informed about explosion, though they experienced changes of their social and ecological environment. Chernobyl appeared crucial for people in Ukraine, as it is marked by great uncertainty, loose of trust and fear.
(NO) NOSTALGIA Mostly the generation born in the 70s  and earlier is more sceptical about changes, because they remember the good things in the Soviet Union. For them, the guarantees provided such as free health care service were appreciated as one of big pluses, that were lost during interview-stills-vienna-poster_2transformation. However, those born in 80s have no feelings of nostalgia: Even in a caring and loving family environment, due to the deficit of food, toys and clothes the Soviet time is remembered as difficult and hardship.
SOLIDARITY 70% agreed that nowadays solidarity is greater than in Soviet time, they experience a new wave of solidary and effective volunteering since the Maydan revolution. The remaining 30% insist that real solidarity was only in Soviet times, because society was based on the value of helping each other in everyday life – and that was gone today.

RUSSIA

TRANSITION MOMENT People remember transition starting in the late 80ies till the beginning of 2000ies. They experienced it as radical change from one social and economic system to a quite different, absolutely new society.
NO RULES One of the striking features of that time is the feeling of ‘no rules’: that most Soviet structures and values in economics and social life were destroyed. New ones needed to be explored and re-invented. Respondents remember this period as free, uncertain, full of hopes and opportunities, and wild.  The same experience, however, had a different impact on people’s life: While some got in a pure survival mode and absorbed by family issues and raising children, others seek business opportunities and enjoyed open borders.
SELF RELIENCE One of the main characteristics of transition is the feeling of becoming self-reliant and independent (in some degree). Respondents don’t trust the state, and try to ‘not to deal’ with the state.  They also understand their own rights, know when they are broken, and try to defend them. This is also seen by them as a ‘heritage of 90ies’. It is worth to know that the respondents take a critical stand towards the current politics and ideology situation in Russia.

GERMANY 

TRANSITION MOMENT Interviews revealed a role switch between children and parents in transition time, as children were able to adapt to the changing society more easily. Parents who were formerly well settled, had to re-orientate; needed to deal with new institutions, rules and values. At the same time, children had to make major decisions for their professional and future life in a dramatically changing educational system. The parents, however, were unable to deal with these issues.
GENERATION DIALOGUE The German case set a focus on dialogue and its effects for relations in the family and between generations. The authors observed three broad patterns of dialogue: 1. children and parents are able to reflect and rethink the past, 2. the dialogue between generation showed clear limits of issues that could be touched, and 3. the dialogue was impossible.
HYPOTHEK OF THE PAST Interviews show, how not talking about the past affects family and generation relations in contrast to those families, where the reflection is not denied. The authors conclude, this effects the overall capacity of a society to critically access the past and present social and political situation: Family members that did not come to terms with transition time privately, were not ready for a debate in a more public space either and less able to deal constructively with current social problems. Yet, many parents do not see a responsibility to speak about the past as a chance to develop future society or social relations. Instead it seems irrelevant to them to deal with something that is gone.

Conclusion

As different as the transition experience was among people in the same country (let alone among the three countries), most interviews reveal a similar crucial experience of lasting impact: loss of trust, rules or orientation. However, this is not only negative. Answers from all three countries suggest that these experiences can be interpreted as opportunities. Of course, this depends on the personal situation. But findings, e.g. from Ukraine, show that the interpretation of transition can be rewritten from negative to positive: While the perception of political institutions is still negative, the Maidan movement lead to a lasting attitude of “the more it is to us, to do something about society”.  Findings from Germany suggest that initiating dialogue and reflection can open spaces for such a reassessment.

Contributors/Interviews: Olena Pravylo (Congress of Cultural Activists, Ukraine), Polina Filipova, Vlada Gekhtman and Oksana Bocharova (Sakharov Center, Russia), Dr. Judith Enders, Dr. Mandy Schulze (Perspektive³, Germany) Christine Wetzel (DRA e.V., Germany).

This Research was Presented at
Deutschlandforschertagung ’16: Children of Transition, Children of War. The “Generation of Transformation” from a European Perspective by Olena Pravylo.

 

“Man muss im Schutzraum des Privaten seine Haltung finden”

Im Buch “Wie war das für Euch? Die Dritte Generation Ost im Gespräch mit ihren Eltern” erzählen die 1975 bis 1985 Geborenen, warum sie nicht aufhören können, sich mit der eigenen Herkunft und der Familiengeschichte auseinanderzusetzen. Die Interviews und Reflexionen im Buch zeigen aber auch, dass diese Auseinandersetzung über Transformationserfahrungen in der Familie auch eine wichtige gesellschaftliche Dimension hat. Judith Enders ist Mitherausgeberin des Buches und Mitglied des Transition Dialogue-Netwerks. Wir haben nachgefragt. 

Was wolltet ihr wissen?

Judith: Gibt es in eurer Familie Kommunikation über die Wendezeit? Wenn ja, wo und wie läuft diese ab, gibt es Tabuthemen oder Grenzen? Wenn nein, warum nicht? Was sind die Ursachen für das Schweigen?

Mit welchen Erwartungen bist Du an das Buch herangegangen?

Judith: Meine Vorannahme, dass sich ein differenziertes Bild ergibt, da es ja nicht den DDR-Bürger gab. Die AutorInnen sind zufällig zusammengestellt, aus unterschiedlichen Lebensumständen: Beruf, soziale Einbindung, Familiengeschichte. Zum Tewie-war-das-fur-euch_cover-2il haben wir Leute angesprochen, die wir kannten. Andere trafen wir einfach zufällig. Das Kriterium war Menschen zu finden, die Lust auf den Dialog mit den Eltern hatten. Aber auch einige, wo die Kommunikation mit der Elterngeneration Schwierigkeiten machte, weil diese eigentlich nicht wollten oder noch nicht darüber nachgedacht hatten – wo unserer Buchprojekt den Impuls gab, diesen Dialog zu beginnen. Das war zum Teil eine emotionale Herausforderung, hier mussten wir die Entstehung des Textes wohlwollend begleiten.

Was hat Euch bewegt, dieses Buch zu machen?

Judith: 2012 organisierten wir mit der Initiative „Dritte Generation Ostdeutschland“ eine Konferenz zum Thema „Die Dritte Generation Ost im Dialog mit der Zweiten Generation“. Hier haben wir gemerkt, dass sich unter den 100 Leuten eine interessante Dynamik entwickelte, eine große Verwunderung darüber, dass das Thema so wenig bearbeitet ist, dass es so wenig Gespräch zwischen den beiden Generationen über die DDR gibt. In den meisten Familien gibt es eine große Sprachlosigkeit, jenseits von Anekdoten oder Allgemeinplätzen über die Vergangenheit. Das hat uns motiviert, dieser Thematik Raum zu geben. Das Buch soll ein Anstoß für die Leserinnen und Leser sein, mit der eigenen Familie ins Gespräch zu kommen und im eigenen Umfeld weiter zu diskutieren.

Warum sollte ich als Mitdreißigerin mit meinen Eltern über die DDR reden?

Judith: Das ist grundsätzlich für alle Menschen wichtig, da unausgesprochene Dinge in der nächsten Generation weiter wirken. Das Spezifische bezüglich der dritten Generation Ostdeutschlands ist, dass ihre Elterngeneration in einer Zeit, in der die Eltern sich normalerweise mit ihren Kindern über ihre Zukunft, Werte etc. auseinandersetzen, also in der Pubertät, dazu wenig Gelegenheit hatten, da sie zu sehr mit sich selbst und der Bewältigung der Umbruchszeit beschäftigt waren.

Eine weitere Dimension ist, dass man nach circa 20 bis 25 Jahren überhaupt erst gesellschaftliche Ereignisse so reflektieren kann, dass die Emotionen nicht überhand gewinnen und eine sachliche Auseinandersetzung erschweren.

In Eurem Buch spricht eine Autorin von der Erwartung eines „Ostdeutschen 68“. Das wäre jetzt zeitlich so weit. Hattet ihr erwartet, dass das käme?

Judith: Erwartet nicht, aber die Idee hat Charme. Ich denke, dass aufgrund des gesellschaftlichen Drucks dafür kein Raum da ist. Es gibt zu viele andere Probleme. Aber nötig wäre es, um eine Aufarbeitung des noch nicht Bearbeiteten anzustoßen. Die Auseinandersetzung mit der DDR erschöpft sich ja nicht im Auswerten der Stasi-Akten. Und in Westdeutschland gab es wenn überhaupt nur eine marginale Auseinandersetzung mit der DDR Alltagskultur und der Wendezeit. Ich glaube, da haben viele kein Gefühl dafür, wie schwierig die Umbruchzeit für viele im Osten war. Da fehlt das Verständnis, nicht nur Empathie sondern einfach das Verstehen, was passiert ist und was das mit den Menschen gemacht hat. Die Bürger aus Westdeutschland sollten auch erkennen, dass die Wende Teil ihrer eigenen Geschichte ist.

Wie wirkt diese verpasste Auseinandersetzung auf die Gesellschaft heute?

Judith: Es gibt immer noch strukturelle Unterschiede im Engagement, in der Bewertung und Wahrnehmung der Demokratie als Staatsform und den Möglichkeiten der Entfaltung, die sie dem Einzelnen bietet.

Es ist wichtig, die eigenen Rolle und das eigene Verhaltens in der DDR erst einmal in der Familie zu reflektieren. Das ist ein Schutzraum, wo das Gespräch weniger mit Schuld und Scham belastet ist und man einfacher darüber reden kann, wie es einem damals erging und wie es einem heute mit der Erfahrung geht. Dies öffnet dann Reflektionsräume dafür, auch öffentlich diese Debatte zu führen und sich auseinanderzusetzen. Man muss im Schutzraum des Privaten zunächst selbst seine Haltung finden, um sich der gesellschaftlichen Auseinandersetzung stellen zu können.

Wenn man die Vergangenheit persönlich nicht verarbeiten kann, dann blockiert das ganze gesellschaftliche Gruppen oder eine ganze Generation – die ja auch nur aus vielen Individuen besteht – neue Situationen und Erfahrungen anzunehmen. Die verpasste Auseinandersetzung im Privaten hindert eine ganze Generation sich mit der Gesellschaft heute, ihren Möglichkeiten aber auch ihren Problemen auseinanderzusetzen.

Das Interview führte Christine Wetzel

„Wie war das für Euch? Die dritte Genration Ostdeutschland im Gespräch mit ihren Eltern.“ Chr. Links Verlag, Berlin 2016

von Judith C. Enders (Hg.) (Autor), Mandy Schulze (Hg.) (Autor), Bianca Ely (Hg.) (Autor)

“Now people have responsibility for what they are doing”

In the course of the Maidan revolution, the Ministry of Culture was occupied by cultural activists in order to develop a more progressive cultural policy for Ukraine. Yaroslav Belinsky belonged to the group of artists who occupied the Ministry and later created the Congress of Cultural Activists. But it’s not just about culture, but the role culture plays for society. The Congress’ claim says “We build a new country”.

Dörte Grimm from the Transition Dialogue-Team interviewed Yaroslav Belinsky, Designer, Member of the Congress of Cultural Activists, in April 2016 in Kiev.

Dörte: Yaroslav, how and when did you come to occupy the Ministry?

We came to occupy the Ministry right after Maidan: The shooting [when 100 protesters where killed] was on 18th, 20th Februar, we occupied the Ministry on the 24th, 25th. We went there for a month of hard and chaotic discussion on how to reform the ministry, how to work there. We were designers, musicians, sculptors – just art people who didn’t know how the ministry works.

So, we created separated groups for cinema, theatre, design, music… 15 groups all together. The main groups was for coordination. But after a month realised that it is not useful just to discuss, we wanted acting, we wanted to understand how culture works. So we left the Ministry and went out to the country, we gathered culture people from all over Ukraine. That was when the Congress of Cultural Activists was created.

Dörte: How did you become active during Maidan?

Yaroslav: I did not make Molotov Cocktails. I went there when it started, when it became a manifestation with million of people on Maidan just in a few weekends. Everyone was there. It was like a big family. Unknown people, but it felt like you knew them for years. That feeling was absolutely amazing. Something really, really new. It was a great impression. We try to cultivate this feeling and try to make it grow in the future.

Dörte: What has changed since the Maidan Revolution?

Yaroslav: The main difference is that now people have responsibility for what they are doing. That is new option for Ukraine. Before, we had the post soviet generation who was just responsible for nothing. As part of Congress we are present in all parts of Ukraine and talk to all kinds of people, not just from culture. And we understand, that they really want to be part of the change. We discuss with them cultural matters and why it is so important. What happened in the East of Ukraine and Crimea is also a reason of a lack of culture and of bad education. It wouldn’t have happened if the situation would have been a different one there.

Dörte: A day before, on a tour through the city, our guide said to us, the time before was unacceptable and unbearable, just years of frustration and total deadlock How did you experience the time before Maidan?

Yaroslav: For me, it was like you do something – but there is a concrete wall between you and what you want, between you and the environment you want to be part of.

Dörte: Because you couldn’t talk, your voice wasn’t heard?

Yaroslav: No, it was not like in the Soviet Union, not that something was restricted. Now it was just absolutely frozen, no development. Just as it is. You try to change something, but the authorities don’t want to. It was comfortable for them: they were just trying to get money from government budget. For instance, the Minister of Culture just kept on doing the same Soviet style events with the same people all the time. We call it Scharavaschena, old fashioned clothes from 400 years ago: That’s what they showed every year, the same costumes with the same dancing. That’s what they called culture. But some kind of new contemporary dance, visual arts – they didn’t understand that this could be part of culture. For them it was not culture, just non-understandable things.

Dörte: How will your next steps look like?

Yaroslav: We have a lot of cooperation with different NGO from Europe. I’m very optimistic for the development of the organisation. We want to found an Open Ukraine Design Center to support and discuss why and how design matters. To work in social, youth, business and government projects. We want to show that design can have a value for everything. And it can be a good packing for all kind of things developed in Ukraine. We have many good products, but they usually have a bad cover.

Dörte: What does transition mean to you?

Yaroslav: I was 11, 12 when the Soviet Union collapsed. It was not as hard for me as for my parents. My parents where in the military and I saw the Soviet Union that was absolutely bad equipped with a low level of support for the members and families. I remember packages with food from the Bundeswehr Army. It was a support from German to Ukraine Army. There was a time we survived just from those packages.

Dörte: But there is still transition going on…

Yaroslav: Yes, sure, we’re young, we have a flexible mind and can change our visions. But older people can’t. Partly it is very hard to speak to them. I can give you the example of a young girl and her grand mother. The young girl said to her grandmother, “how can you be sad that the Soviet time is gone? They killed millions of people in camps”. She answered, “yes, but we had ice cream for 3 Kopeks”. For our generation that is absolutely inappropriate. But for them it is o.k. Every second family I know in my environment has relatives who where shot in the 30s in the Soviet time, for instance my great grand parents. They were from Poland and lived in Ukraine, an intellectual family of teachers. They were shot not for their opinion or acting, just because they were Polish and educated. So Soviet time is nothing romantic for my generation.

Dörte: Do you think Ukraine is on a good way?

Yaroslav: Very slow, but I hope faster in the next year. And I hope that we as part of the change can help to make it better and be useful.

Dörte: Where do you get your motivation and energy from?

Yaroslav: We feel like a big family, the Congress team. When someone is depressed and loosing energy – which keeps happening – we do see that and support each other. It is very helpful to be part of that team.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=asIz0gqAXX0&feature=youtu.be

What motivates people to become a driver of change in a time of transition?

Results from a Workshop at the 2015 NECE Conference in Thessaloniki, 22nd October 2015

Why we are asking this question

“Transition ends when we have disenchantment,” we learned in our first meeting in Sofia. But when transition ends due to disenchantment, it does not mean, that everything is ‘done’. Rather, people have become frustrated about the transition process, they do not believe in their possibility to bring about change. As activists, teachers, researchers in the wide field of civil society and citizenship education one of our main concerns is how to empower people. How to encourage them to be the change the want to see happen? In this brief workshop we presented best practice and learnings from our own work and asked participants to share their experience.

The workshop was held by Many Schulze (Perspektive³, Berlin), Olena Pravilo (Congress of Cultural Activists, Kiev) and Christine Wetzel (German-Russian-Exchange, Berlin). Documented on film by Dörte Grimm (Perspective³).

The workshops participants joined us from Georgia, Moldova, Ukraine, Armenia, Belarus, Azerbaijan, Croatia and Germany.

Olena’s Case on DIMG_20151022_150044riving Change: Establishing a Cultural Management in the community of Zaporizhzhya (Ukraine)

It all started with the occupation of the Ukraine Ministry of Education. The idea was spread on Facebook by artists and cultural managers after the end of the Janukovich government. It was not to destroy anything symbolically, but actually to do better, and to run the ministry with a lot more passion and expertise.

The problems of Ukraine’s cultural administration were, according to Olena, lacking concepts for cultural development, overall bad administration of policies, and no openness towards other sectors as education or economy. The idea of self-made cultural policy spread to other cities, Assemblies of Culture were set up and registered as NGOs – as in the community of Zaporizhzhya.

Olena explained, what drove the activists to take this great challenge was not to accept excuses: “We in Ukraine can always look at other countries and find reasons why things can not be changed here: Because we have less money than Germany, because we are not so small like Estonia, and so on. But we said, we can do it. We just start, see what works elsewhere and try to do it here.”

Therefore, the activists in Zaporizhzhya invited experts from all over the Ukraine to share their experiences and best practice from other communities. There was no big funding for this event, everybody traveled on her or his own expanses, local activists all provided their bit to make the event happen. It was a kick-off for cultural self-management in the Zaporizhzhya. By now, the activities have resulted in the initiating of a cultural strategy for the community, and the developing of a cooperation with the Economic University. A book fair was established and diverse cultural projects created.

“We need examples, we need to repeat them, spread them, show others what works,” Olena stressed, and, as simple as crucial: “Ask people to do something! Encourage them, give them examples of what they can actually achieve. Do you have a telescope, do you know something about the space? Why don’t you show children the starts and the universe?”

Mandy’s Case on Driving Change: How young people looking for place to live accidentally opened a social space and investigated local history (Germany)

Mandy’s story of change had to starting points. One was a typical ‘lost place’, like you can find plenty of it all over the former communist countries in every community: empty town halls, factories, schools, hotels ect.

One the other side there were five young people looking for a place to live and work. They found an empty, run down public house in the town of Niederoderwitz to settle.

“The five had nothing in mind with community issues or civic empowerment,” says Mandy. “But From the moment they had started to work ob the house, they got confronted with locals who stopped by and asked to come in and have look. They became aware of the enormous meaning the house has for the people in the village.” For decades all festivities had been celebrated here; birth, birthdays, carnival, thanksgiving… With closure off the hotel the village had lost it’s social heart, the place were people would meet.

So, they opened the house for a first garden party – and 800 out of 1.500 villagers came. Consequently, the house was opened regular and became the new community center. The group of 5 people grew to 25. They were confronted with new issues of management; dealing with the administration, finding supporters and funding, investigating the local history. They invited chronologists and historians. They established themselves in the village, got children and had to deal with related issues, like Infrastructure for young families.

Essentially, the hotel hall was not just a place to celebrate. A public space like this is simply crucial for the development of a sense of community in the first place. Without a place to gather, community life is disintegrating, emptying and frustration growing that there is ‘nothing here anymore’. The five young people had realized the potential of that place. How it matters to people, that they perceived it as an open wound in their village – and they are willing to change something about it, to give it new sense. By accident, they, just seeking affordable housing, became community activists, bringing public space and local citizen-driven self-organization (back) to live.

Thus, in terms of the workshop question, the case shows three things: Firstly, start small and local, the ‘home’ is a place everyone can emotionally connect to – and this is crucial.

Secondly, the people can create a political awareness starting from concerns for issues that are considered to be not political at all, like housing, some questions asked on the past.

And finally – despite all praise to the possibilities of virtual communication – the necessity to provide a physical space, a laboratory and hub for encounters and those who are willing to be drivers of change.

see more of this case on Facebook: www.facebook.com/KretschamNiederoderwitzEv/

In 2013 a network was founded supporting initiatives like that in Niederoderwitz reclaiming the public space. They are analysing and providing knowledge and support on issues like: What are triggers for civic engagement?
What are the challanges for those who want to engage? How can they be supported?  www.zukunft-oberlausitz.com

Open Discussion Results

We asked everyone to note down her and his answer to the workshop question and later share it with us. Here are insights the that were given by the participants from their experience:

  • Do not work on a group, you want to do something for, but work with them. Listen and develop approaches with them, that build on their needs, ideas and capacity.
  • Show people ‘the better live’ that is possible and provide them with examples how to get there.
  • You need a common issue if you want to keep people on board. This seems obvious, but often it is not the case when you look closer.
  • Education is an extremely powerful tool!
  • Ask people questions that make them start thinking.
  • Talk, talk, talk to people! Support encounters between different groups to share experience and examples, then develop programs to implement knowledge in practice.
  • We need to make ourselves visible, we need public spaces to unfold, grow and spread ideas.
  • Perform the best examples of your own, be the example, be the change – start local, then grow up the levels.
  • Support the people, who are willing to do something; empower them, build their confidence, if possible provide financial support.
  • Show them the consequences of their actions, show them what happens when the make changes – and what if not.
  • Networking and team-building: Make people feel that they are not alone!
  • You need to organize and structure the ideas, provide the ground to make ideas work
  • Lower administration burden!

The workshop holders suggest, that the examples given by the participant apply to all kind of civic engagement in different circumstances. We further suggest, all the points given link into each other and form a ‘Circle of Motivation‘:

The chart point to motivation and incentive structures on different levels; the individual (1) (2), but also organizational (3) (6) and institutional (4, also including funding) level, that are all relevant for people to drive change processes – though one can partly make up for the other. Bottom up activity should ideally meet a top down structure that facilitates engagement, e.g. with funding, providing spaces for meeting, give access to key actors. But this are not opposites: The Ukraine example shows the attempt of changing this very environment for activity.

The six elements build on each other and are linked, but they are not solely linear: E.g., sure, it helps to talk about and spread your cause at every stage of the circle. And, obviously, listen to those you want to address with your activity before you start is always a good idea! As it was stressed by a participant from Georgia early in the discussion, our attitude towards those who we want to work with is important. We should be facilitator, not the instructor who always knows better. For there is nothing less encouraging if you do not get the chance to follow your own ideas.

And finally: Do never forget about the social experience of engagement! Whatever you do; provide space for getting together also with agenda, celebrate results, tell others, honor activity and – say thanks.

Circle of Motivation

Driving Change Diagram

Thank you to all of you who joined this workshop and shared their experience!

by Christine Wetzel

see the workshop video and read more about what we did at the conference http://www.transition-dialogue.org/workshop-at-the-2015-nece-conference-in-thessaloniki-22nd-october

Reanimation Package of Reforms: From Maidan to Policy Making

In 2014 the Maidan Revolution overthrew the government of president Yanukovich. Unlike after the Orange Revolution years before, many of the protesters decided that this time they would not go home and hope that things will change for the better – just because there is a new government. They had come to stay and help building a new country.

One of them is Artem Myrgorodskyi. After he had helped to evacuate wounded people in the Maidan Revolution, he founded REANIMATION PACKAGE OF REFORMS, an NGO that is working out a policy agenda for Ukraine. Since its establishment, the RPR was engaged in the adoption of 80 laws in Ukraine, says Mr. Myrgorodskyi.

Find Reanimation Package of Reform’s website here

Previous to working in the civic sector, Mr. Myrgorodskyi explained, he was a marketing manager in three different companies. His career changed when he participated at the Maidan1 movement, and helped evacuate 230 wounded people. In the chaos of the movement, he was the head of the initiative to help the wounded people, and soon after he formed an NGO which is still a functioning and prominent Ukrainian NGO. He decided to move on from marketing and work in the civic society because he found it to be necessary and required by the country that has to be changed in the nearest future.

The RPR is a coalition of 56 NGOs, mainly participants of the movement Maidan. While some of the Maidan participants went to practice politics, others decided to extend their activities to the civic sector and aim to coordinate activities and initiatives, tP1000920 (800x797)hus supporting the politicians, rather than taking part in the politics personally. That was why the Platform first started. The RPR was established in March 2013(???). It started with 30 people, and subsequently many more members joined later, growing to the number of 56 NGOs, in this way becoming the biggest Ukrainian organization of this type in the last 25 years. The main goal of the RPR is to influence and impact the politicians through many diverse activities :they discuss the agenda in the Government Office, advocate for different reforms, collaborating with over 70 MEPs from the Ukrainian Government. They have collaborated with the more progressive MEPs, the ones that are proactive, that are willing to cooperate, the ones that understand the reforms and its importance, and don’t only push the buttons, that are conscious (20%). Since its establishment, the RPR was engaged in the adoption of 80 laws in Ukraine.

The RPR does not communicate with the political parties, but rather finds personal contacts, mostly in the politicians who can impact the group from the inside. As for the Yanukovich, the opposition, the RPR’s attitude towards them is that they cannot cooperate with them because “they robbed the nation and killed the people”. However, they communicate with them, inform them about the agendas, but they are not invited to vote. It is important not to develop relationships with either parties or individual whose values do not match with the Maidan values. The RPR’s firm opinion is, that if they start developing the relationship with the enemies, the system could collapse.

The RPR’s governance model is a horizontal structure of various experts working in 23 groups concerning different civil society fields. The members are either the employees of the 56 NGOs or individual experts, presenting a core of top experts from the respective fields. They operate in a very well structured way. There is a procedure how to join the RPR, whose executive body is a council of 12 people that are yearly elected, mainly from the biggest NGOs. The Council appoints the managers and heads of departments; it makes decisions about accepting new members (the priorities are well-known organizations, especially from the fields the RPR lacks experts from). They proactively look for the partners and strive to build relationships with big companies and keep them informed. For example, when discussing an issue, the experts from within the RPR are called first. Consequently, after their draft proposal is approved, and if it’s a top priority, the second stage consists of open discussions with the different opponents of the reform, together with the MEPs. The expert groups work with the expert initiatives, white and green books, or policies. They work with hundreds of journalists, place news every day, communicate with the authorities, and write analytical notes that justify their efforts in pushing the reforms in a particular way. In their efforts, they communicate directly to around 70 more progressive MEPs. The same work happens on two different levels: at the organizations’ headquarters and at the cabinets of ministers. The RPR has an international communication department that was encouraged by the Brussels, Berlin and Washington institutions. They have good relationships with the three ambassadors, and pride in their good relations with some other influential institutions that easily and promptly get informed about any news, and are quick to react and help them if needed. They expanded to the Ukrainian regions where the civic sector is still somewhat underdeveloped. On this mission, the RPR visited 26 towns and promoted the idea of uniting efforts.

The RPR understood the need of a fixed structure and donations, so they made efforts to find donors and partners throughout the national and international structures in Ukraine. They found agreements with the EU Commission office, USAID, Swedish and German Embassy, Soros, SIDA, etc. Since they were successful, they got the contract for the next 2 years (about 1 mil euros).

As for sustainability, the RPR invests in the youth potential of their members. What is more, they see as the source of the future politicians – they support the young people informally and formally, through an initiative called the University of Reforms. The initiative relies on lectures held by some of the top experts which share their knowledge on different spheres, mostly concerning the reforms. This initiative is an addition to the formal University, and is supported by the Swedish SIDA. The RPR sees this initiative as good grounds for forming the future unbiased and capable politicians. On the other hand, when it comes to any sort of bias, the RPR has a strict policy against it, and therefore it is forbidden for the politicians to be in the RPR. Furthermore, concerning the youth initiatives, there are many praiseworthy efforts of the RPR to include the youth in the reform process, one of them being a group that is reforming youth policies, presenting the Eastern Partnership Working Group Forum. The Forum aims to use culture to prevent and resolve conflicts, and works on youth immigration from the Eastern Partnership. One of the main issues they deal with is how to keep the youth in their countries of origin and, more importantly, how to help them develop the respective countries.

The secret of RPR’s success lies primarily in rules and values. Their main policy is assessment of how the values link to priorities. Moreover, there are 7 priorities chosen by the main RPR body, the Assembly of the NGOs, each year. However, this does not mean that the other sectors are being deprived of any sort of development, but their issues are addressed only after the priorities have been dealt with. The RPR strategy changes once a year, together with the priorities. 85% of the resources are always used to fight corruption, and to reform the Prosecutors’ Office (that is still heavily on the basis of the previous Yanukovich government, with most professional and skilled people, but very corrupt). However, whatever the priorities are, they always try to accentuate that in the core of the State problems there is a cultural problem (values, what is wrong, what is permitted), and thus they highly support the cultural activists.

Looking back, one of the biggest lessons that the RPR activists have learned is that the people who work free of charge (300 people) can be more proactive than the paid ones. They have realized the importance of synergy, and see immense potential in mutual support. The RPR is highly aware of the fact that the reanimation should be done fast, but they see the great importance that is put on the balance of opinions and general inclusion. With that, the biggest aim of the RPR platform is to change the way of forming the legislative initiatives: right now, 80% of the executive power still belongs to the Parliament, and the RPR’s goal is to change it and share the agenda of starting from scratch in each policy making, including all sorts of experts, and only after the thorough investigation and discussion, drafting the law.

The way of functioning that the RPR has is convenient. There is a clear obligation to act on the demand of the society. The RPR is understood as a face of the society, and are contacted mainly when the politicians what to communicate with the society. It’s a very well placed position. The politicians understand that the society is very different and demanding, and it is of extreme importance not to be dismissed by it. It is for this reason that the RPR has the positive response from the side of the authorities. To change the country, the patriotism is not enough, but it is certainly a good starting point.

Author’s note: The members of the “Generation in Transition” met with Mr. Artem Myrgorodskyi, the Head of Secretariat of the Reanimation Package of Reforms (RPR) in Kyiv, Ukraine, on April 18th 2016 to hear more about the RPR and to present their organizations. Article by Rafaela Tripalo.

1 A wave of demonstrations and civil unrest in Ukraine, which began on the night of 21 November 2013 with public protests in Maidan Nezalezhnosti (“Independence Square”) in Kiev, demanding closer European integration. The scope of the protests expanded, with many calls for the resignation of President Viktor Yanukovych and his government. The protests led to the 2014 Ukrainian revolution. Many protesters joined because of the violent dispersal of protesters on 30 November and “a will to change life in Ukraine.”By 25 January 2014, the protests had been fueled by the perception of “widespread government corruption,” “abuse of power,” and “violation of human rights in Ukraine.” Protests climaxed in mid-February. Police and protesters fired live and rubber ammunition across multiple locations in Kiev. Riot police advanced towards Maidan and clashed with protesters but did not fully occupy it. Fighting continued the following days which saw the vast majority of casualties. In connection with the events of February 18–20, Yanukovych was forced to make concessions to the opposition to end the bloodshed in Kiev and end the crisis. The Agreement on settlement of political crisis in Ukraine was signed by Vitaly Klitschko, Arseny Yatsenyuk, Oleh Tyahnybok. The signing was witnessed by the Foreign Ministers of Germany and Poland, Frank-Walter Steinmeier, Radosław Sikorski, respectively, and the Director of the Continental Europe Department of the French Foreign Ministry, Eric Fournier. Vladimir Lukin, representing Russia, refused to sign the agreement. In late February 2014, Yanukovych and many other high government officials fled the country. Protesters gained control of the presidential administration and Yanukovych’s private estate. Subsequently, the parliament removed Yanukovych from office, replaced the government with a pro-European one, and ordered that former Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko be released from prison.

How painting a door may change peoples mind on community

The activists of „Dyvovyzhni“ use small tools to change the attitude of people. Like painting the entrance of an average apartment block. Sounds like no big deal? It is!

There are many stories on how people change their society or community for the Maria Nasiedkina (600x800)better. However, most initiatives rely on people who made the first step to active citizenship themselves. Maria Nasiedkina’s NGO „Dyvovyzhni“ is a wonderful example of a different kind.

Find Dyvovyzhni on Facebook or visit the Website

The typical entrance of an five-storage apartment block looks rather neglected. The stairs have started to crumble. The initial painting has faded, doors and walls are covered with the scraps of advertisement and graffiti. There is litter around. Inside, the corridor is usually no better…

„The typical attitude of the inhabitants is, that always someone else should do something about it. The the administration, the mayor…”, says Maria. She and her fellow activists want to engage the people in the particular house to take action themselves, and – by doing this – to develop an attitude of involvement and responsibility towards their very community. To understand, that they actually can make change.

“People are at first usually suspicious. They wonder, ‘Who are you?’, ‘Why would you want to spend money on this?’, ‘Are you political?’” Dyvovyzhni’s approach is to find a person in or outside the house who is connected to the inhabitants. This person does the first step to the people and helps building trust. “We only work with people who have sympathy for our idea.” So, sometimes it is a long way until the inhabitants meet and paint the walls of the entrance in a common effort.

What motivates people – some lessons learned

After such a project is finished Dyvovyzhni provides a kind of toolbox for the people involved to keep on working in that spirit of community and engagement they have just developed.

“There is no red button to activate community”, says Maria. But she has a few tips and learnings for those who want to:

  • The first very important: Don’t enter a space like you’re all knowing and everyone should just do what you say to be fine. Be passionate – but be humble.

  • Engage all people in every stage of your initiative.

  • Ask for feedback and show that you consider it.

  • Look for local leaders who have the trust of the community. Otherwise you’re just a stranger from outside.

  • Demonstrate you’re prepared to take action yourself. Be the good example. Do not just preach.

The power of small

There’s another reason why Maria favours small scale projects to change peoples mind about their role as citizens of a community. That is to be able to make an impact from the start, which is of big importance when you try activate people. “People can tell you about a lot of problems. You need to identify one or two specific and you need to have the capacity to do something about it.” That is also important for word-of-mouth-communication: The need to show something concrete.

Common believe goes that people would get involved when a problem is presented as particular big as it creates more urgency. But in fact, too big problems often rather frustrate and lead to apathy as ‘I can not do anything about this anyway’. “What motivates people is the feeling that ‘I could do that too!’. But therefore, someone needs to do the first step.”

Dyvovyzhni also does clean up activities with children. Always the aim is to draw people in: it is your park, your yard! “We try to make them think and talk about their community and develop a different view.”

Author’s note: Christine met Maria at the Congress of Cultural Activists’ Networking Weekend in Kiev, Ukraine, April 2016.

NECE Congress “Us” and “them” Greece, October 22-24, 2015

Workshop I

What motivates people to become a driver of change in a time of transition?

Results from a Workshop at the 2015 NECE Conference in Thessaloniki, 22nd October 2015

Why we are asking this question

“Transition ends when we have disenchantment,” we learned in our first meeting in Sofia. But when transition ends due to disenchantment, it does not mean, that everything is ‘done’. Rather, people have become frustrated about the transition process, they do not believe in their possibility to bring about change. As activists, teachers, researchers in the wide field of civil society and citizenship education one of our main concerns is how to empower people. How to encourage them to be the change the want to see happen? In this brief workshop we presented best practice and learnings from our own work and asked participants to share their experience.

The workshop was held by Many Schulze (Perspektive³, Berlin), Olena Pravilo (Congress of Cultural Activists, Kiev) and Christine Wetzel (German-Russian-Exchange, Berlin). Documented on film by Dörte Grimm (Perspective³).

The workshops participants joined us from Georgia, Moldova, Ukraine, Armenia, Belarus, Azerbaijan, Croatia and Germany.

Olena’s Case on Driving Change: Establishing a Cultural Management in the community of Zaporizhzhya (Ukraine)

It all started with the occupation of the Ukraine Ministry of Education. The idea was spread on Facebook by artists and cultural managers after the end of the Janukovich government. It was not to destroy anything symbolically, but actually to do better, and to run the ministry with a lot more passion and expertise.

The problems of Ukraine’s cultural administration were, according to Olena, lacking concepts for cultural development, overall bad administration of policies, and no openness towards other sectors as education or economy. The idea of self-made cultural policy spread to other cities, Assemblies of Culture were set up and registered as NGOs – as in the community of Zaporizhzhya.

Olena explained, what drove the activists to take this great challenge was not to accept excuses: “We in Ukraine can always look at other countries and find reasons why things can not be changed here: Because we have less money than Germany, because we are not so small like Estonia, and so on. But we said, we can do it. We just start, see what works elsewhere and try to do it here.”

Therefore, the activists in Zaporizhzhya invited experts from all over the Ukraine to share their experiences and best practice from other communities. There was no big funding for this event, everybody traveled on her or his own expanses, local activists all provided their bit to make the event happen. It was a kick-off for cultural self-management in the Zaporizhzhya. By now, the activities have resulted in the initiating of a cultural strategy for the community, and the developing of a cooperation with the Economic University. A book fair was established and diverse cultural projects created.

“We need examples, we need to repeat them, spread them, show others what works,” Olena stressed, and, as simple as crucial: “Ask people to do something! Encourage them, give them examples of what they can actually achieve. Do you have a telescope, do you know something about the space? Why don’t you show children the starts and the universe?”

Mandy’s Case on Driving Change: How young people looking for place to live accidentally opened a social space and investigated local history (Germany)

Mandy’s story of change had to starting points. One was a typical ‘lost place’, like you can find plenty of it all over the former communist countries in every community: empty town halls, factories, schools, hotels ect.

One the other side there were five young people looking for a place to live and work. They found an empty, run down public house in the town of Niederoderwitz to settle.

“The five had nothing in mind with community issues or civic empowerment,” says Mandy. “But From the moment they had started to work ob the house, they got confronted with locals who stopped by and asked to come in and have look. They became aware of the enormous meaning the house has for the people in the village.” For decades all festivities had been celebrated here; birth, birthdays, carnival, thanksgiving… With closure off the hotel the village had lost it’s social heart, the place were people would meet.

So, they opened the house for a first garden party – and 800 out of 1.500 villagers came. Consequently, the house was opened regular and became the new community center. The group of 5 people grew to 25. They were confronted with new issues of management; dealing with the administration, finding supporters and funding, investigating the local history. They invited chronologists and historians. They established themselves in the village, got children and had to deal with related issues, like Infrastructure for young families.

Essentially, the hotel hall was not just a place to celebrate. A public space like this is simply crucial for the development of a sense of community in the first place. Without a place to gather, community life is disintegrating, emptying and frustration growing that there is ‘nothing here anymore’. The five young people had realized the potential of that place. How it matters to people, that they perceived it as an open wound in their village – and they are willing to change something about it, to give it new sense. By accident, they, just seeking affordable housing, became community activists, bringing public space and local citizen-driven self-organization (back) to live.

Thus, in terms of the workshop question, the case shows three things: Firstly, start small and local, the ‘home’ is a place everyone can emotionally connect to – and this is crucial.

Secondly, the people can create a political awareness starting from concerns for issues that are considered to be not political at all, like housing, some questions asked on the past.

And finally – despite all praise to the possibilities of virtual communication – the necessity to provide a physical space, a laboratory and hub for encounters and those who are willing to be drivers of change.

see more of this case on Facebook: www.facebook.com/KretschamNiederoderwitzEv/

In 2013 a network was founded supporting initiatives like that in Niederoderwitz reclaiming the public space. They are analysing and providing knowledge and support on issues like: What are triggers for civic engagement?
What are the challanges for those who want to engage? How can they be supported?  www.zukunft-oberlausitz.com

Open Discussion Results

We asked everyone to note down her and his answer to the workshop question and later share it with us. Here are insights the that were given by the participants from their experience:

  • Do not work on a group, you want to do something for, but work with them. Listen and develop approaches with them, that build on their needs, ideas and capacity.
  • Show people ‘the better live’ that is possible and provide them with examples how to get there.
  • You need a common issue if you want to keep people on board. This seems obvious, but often it is not the case when you look closer.
  • Education is an extremely powerful tool!
  • Ask people questions that make them start thinking.
  • Talk, talk, talk to people! Support encounters between different groups to share experience and examples, then develop programs to implement knowledge in practice.
  • We need to make ourselves visible, we need public spaces to unfold, grow and spread ideas.
  • Perform the best examples of your own, be the example, be the change – start local, then grow up the levels.
  • Support the people, who are willing to do something; empower them, build their confidence, if possible provide financial support.
  • Show them the consequences of their actions, show them what happens when the make changes – and what if not.
  • Networking and team-building: Make people feel that they are not alone!
  • You need to organize and structure the ideas, provide the ground to make ideas work
  • Lower administration burden!

The workshop holders suggest, that the examples given by the participant apply to all kind of civic engagement in different circumstances. We further suggest, all the points given link into each other and form a ‘Circle of Motivation‘:

The chart point to motivation and incentive structures on different levels; the individual (1) (2), but also organizational (3) (6) and institutional (4, also including funding) level, that are all relevant for people to drive change processes – though one can partly make up for the other. Bottom up activity should ideally meet a top down structure that facilitates engagement, e.g. with funding, providing spaces for meeting, give access to key actors. But this are not opposites: The Ukraine example shows the attempt of changing this very environment for activity.

The six elements build on each other and are linked, but they are not solely linear: E.g., sure, it helps to talk about and spread your cause at every stage of the circle. And, obviously, listen to those you want to address with your activity before you start is always a good idea! As it was stressed by a participant from Georgia early in the discussion, our attitude towards those who we want to work with is important. We should be facilitator, not the instructor who always knows better. For there is nothing less encouraging if you do not get the chance to follow your own ideas.

And finally: Do never forget about the social experience of engagement! Whatever you do; provide space for getting together also with agenda, celebrate results, tell others, honor activity and – say thanks.

Circle of Motivation

Driving Change Diagram

Thank you to all of you who joined this workshop and shared their experience!

 (Protocol by Christine Wetzel)


Workshop II

“Otherness” through the eyes of the generation of transition

The workshop explored the way the generation of transition understands the notion of “otherness” and how their current perception has been influenced by the process of transition towards democracy in the post-communist space. The participants presented the results of a small scale study on the topic, conducted in several countries from Eastern and Central Europe.

Olena Pravylo, Congress of Cultural Activists (Ukraine)

Rafaela Tripalo, “Stiftung Wissen am Werk” (Knowledge at Work Foundation, Croatia)

Iva Kopraleva, Sofia Platform (Bulgaria)

Moderator:
Louisa Slavkova, European Council on Foreign Relations/ Sofia Platform (Bulgaria)

@NECE Congress – “Us” and “them” – Citizenship education in an interdependent world, Thessaloniki, Greece, October 22-24 2015

Bulgaria: Remembrance versus ignorance

Communism and its long shadows

Bulgaria embarked on the path to transition towards democracy on 10 November 1989 when the Central Committee of the Bulgarian Communist Party relieved Todor Zhivkov of his duties as a Secretary General of the Party and as a Head of State. After almost half a century of authoritarianism, the political and economic system in the country changed rapidly and drastically, at least at first glance. However, behind the democratic exterior of the newly established Republic of Bulgaria (as opposed to People’s Republic of Bulgaria), the residues from the Communist past were so obvious and easy to perceive that a new term was conceived to describe this peculiar state of affairs, namely ‘façade democracy’. Behind this idea lie a number of characteristics of the Bulgarian transition, many of which are, at least to a certain extent valid even today, 26 years after the fall of Communism. However, one of the most worrying trends when it comes to the future development of Bulgaria, especially in the context of dysfunctional or semi-functional state institutions, is the striking ignorance among young people in particular about the Communist period and its implications on the political life in Bulgaria today. Let us explore the issue in more details.

The data

According to a sociological study, conducted by Alpha Research as part of Sofia Platform’s project “25 Years Free Bulgaria”, the young people in Bulgaria are remarkably uninformed when it comes to the period before 1989. Out of the people of age between 16 and 30, 79% claim that they are almost not familiar with the development in Bulgaria in the interval 1944 – 1989 while only 6% say that they have knowledge of this period. 69% of the people in the same age group do not associate the 1980s with any important events while only 15% associate the decade with the fall of the Berlin wall and 11% with the resignation of Todor Zhivkov. Their knowledge of the Communist rule in Bulgaria is based predominantly on personal impressions and conversations and not on books, movies or school/university lessons.

There are glaring knowledge gaps among the young Bulgarians when it comes to the historic figures and key events which brought about the transition towards democracy. More concretely, 68% do not know who Margaret Thatcher is, 73% are unfamiliar with Ronald Reagan and 89% have not heard of Helmut Kohl while 51% are even uninformed about Todor Zhivkov. What is more, 40% of the young Bulgarians cannot answer whether the end of Communism was marked by the fall of the Berlin wall, the Chinese wall, the Sofia wall or the Moscow wall and 92% of them cannot point out the borders of the Eastern Bloc.

There is clearly a gap in the education of the younger generation and an overall remembrance problem in the Bulgarian society as a whole when it comes to the Communist era. The educational system in Bulgaria has not been able to convey the necessary information to the young people and to create a solid knowledge base regarding this important and extremely relevant period of the Bulgarian and European history.

Who is to blame?

According to the study, citied above, only 10% of the people aged between 16 and 30 obtained their knowledge about the Communist era at school or at the university. The educational system in Bulgaria is therefore clearly at fault. There are several important factors which contribute to the ignorance of the Bulgarian students.

Firstly, the Communist period in Bulgaria is primarily taught to students in their history classes in the 11th grade. Even though the amount of lessons in the different state approved history textbooks varies and there are minor differences in the presented information, the emphasis is almost always placed on the political, and occasionally, on the economic aspects of the regime. Although these perspectives are certainly important, the implemented approach leaves students with no knowledge about the everyday life of people under this regime and the way the state interfered or influenced even the most mundane activities of its citizens. In addition, there are almost no accounts or personal stories of the victims of this regime or of the Bulgarian dissidents. It is unclear how the Communist party interfered with all aspects of the cultural and professional life of Bulgarians. These gaps prevent the textbooks from being understandable and relatable and leave the lessons about Communism on a relatively abstract level for the students where they learn about key dates and historical figures without being able to comprehend the significance and relevance of the studied historic events and processes.

Secondly, even the limited and imperfect amount of information on Communism, included in the Bulgarian textbook is often swept under the carpet by the history teachers. The lessons on Communism are crammed up at the end of the curriculum for the 11th grade and more often than not at the end of the school year time is not sufficient to go into the topic in detail. In addition, the material on Communism is not included in the History State Exam or in the entry exams for universities. For these reasons, teachers often undertake a practical approach by ignoring the Communist period and focusing on the topics that are relevant for the aforementioned examinations.

Finally, the topic of Communism is still sensitive and even polarizing for the Bulgarian society. Teachers today have witnessed at least part of the Communist period personally and the information they present to the students might be a mixture of the objective facts and their subjective perceptions. Most of them are unprepared and untrained in separating the two. In fact, very few materials are available to aid history teachers in presenting the topic of Communism to their students and the state guidelines on the subject are vague at best.

The interplay between these factors might help us explain the results of the sociological study, presented above. However, it is important to think about the next steps towards addressing the overwhelming ignorance about the Communist period in Bulgaria.

The next steps

A number of educational activities should be undertaken in order to address the gaps in the Bulgarian educational system on the topic of Communism. These might include open lessons in the Bulgarian schools and universities, training seminars for teachers, various cultural events for students, including exhibitions, movie screening, literary readings and discussions. In addition, the Communist era should be included in all internal and external examinations, in order to ensure that the students are paying sufficient attention to the study material.

George Santayana once said “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” We need to ensure that the Bulgarian youth is aware of their history in order to be certain that the mistakes from the Communist past are never repeated.

by Louisa Slavkova and Iva Kopraleva

Россия: Поколение транзита

«Поколение транзита». Любовь Борусяк, Алексей Левинсон, Василий Жарков, Денис Волков, Сергей Лукашевский, Полина Филиппова.

Обсуждение в Сахаровском Центре на 3 сентября 2015 г.

Talk at Sakharov Center in Moscow on the Transition Generation in Russia
Klick here for an English and German summary of the talk

Сергей Лукашевский: Общая тема нашего разговора – попытка очертить рамки подхода к проблеме, которую можно было бы назвать «поколением транзита». Конечно, когда это произносится на условном Западе, имеется в виду демократический транзит. А в нашем понимании, как я обозначил в первом вопросе, о каком транзите мы вообще говорим? И транзит ли это, или что-то совершенно другое? Во всяком случае, у нас тоже происходили некие тектонические социальные процессы. Есть поколения, на чью долю выпало переживать эти процессы. Хотелось бы в нашем сегодняшнем разговоре попытаться выявить, что же это было, что это за поколение, можно ли, пусть не в порядке научного знания, а в порядке гипотезы очертить его рамки, подобрать термины и так далее. Это делается для того, чтобы потом (возможно) принять участие в большом международном проекте, который посвящён, с одной стороны, изучению этого вопроса, а с другой стороны – просвещению и установлению контактов между представителями этого «поколения транзита» в центрально-, южно- и восточноевропейских странах, включая Россию. Я попытался набросать несколько вопросов, но, как и писал в письме, это не жёсткий список, а открытый. Если видится необходимость переформулировать тот или иной вопрос, добавить или расширить, то я буду только рад и признателен.

Давайте, наверное, по стандартному порядку небольшие реплики. Сначала про то, что есть транзит или нет транзита, и какой транзит, и как можно определить, отталкиваясь от понятия «политический транзит», что же у нас происходило в последние двадцать пять – тридцать лет.

Денис Волков: Если говорить про транзит, то он сейчас и в России – после «Путей России», шанинской конференции, где Теодор Шанин поставил под сомнение понятие транзита. Для него это не изменение, а состояние. И на Западе – после статьи Томаса Каротерса 2002 года в Journal of DemocracyThe End of the Transition Paradigm», 19 January 2002), где поставлен под сомнение сам концепт транзита – если и понятно, откуда транзит, то непонятно – куда.

Сергей Лукашевский: В демократию?

Денис Волков: Да, действительно, прежде всего в неё. Само возникновение этого термина было связано с так называемой третьей волной демократии. Но, фактически, состоялась она только в Восточной Европе, где на смену коммунистическим режимам пришли демократические. В других же странах, в том числе в России, на сегодняшний день всё закончилось, по мнению Каротерса, некоей серой зоной – вроде бы и есть демократические институты, но работают они явно не демократическим образом. Кто-то называет это гибридными режимами, где-то это уже просто закрытые, авторитарные режимы. Поэтому странно говорить о транзите. Скорее, можно говорить о неудавшемся транзите. Можно говорить об этом поколении, поколении перестройки и реформ, которое приходится на период с 1985 по 2000 года, так Левада выделял. Но те же самые рамки заданы для поколения Y. Конечно, у этих поколений есть много общего, если мы говорим о сравнительном проекте между странами, поскольку есть общие процессы урбанизации, глобализации, рынок, потребление, поп-культура, Голливуд и так далее. В этом смысле российские представители этого поколения, прежде всего – городские жители будут очень похожи на поляков, немцев и так далее. Ещё и интернет, конечно. Но если говорить о политических предпочтениях, то там будет всё другое, поскольку политические институты более ли менее реформированы, и они задают или даже навязывают эти предпочтения. В чём-то мы будем видеть явное сходство, но если говорить именно о политическом транзите, то всё будет очень по-разному.

Сергей Лукашевский: А сам по себе распад политических институтов является общим, объединяющим фактором – без знака, мы не определяем, каковы последствия распада этих институтов, пошли ли они правильным демократическим, или неправильным авторитарным путём.

Денис Волков: В каком-то смысле – да, но дело в том, что если в России и на постсоветском пространстве, о чём всегда говорит Лев Гудков, распад тоталитарных институтов. Пусть это распад тоталитарных институтов, но сейчас на Западе чаще говорят как о распаде демократических институтов, о том, что они находятся в упадке. То есть распад идёт, в каком-то смысле, с разных сторон. Везде есть проблемы, связанные с эффективностью государства, государственных институтов. (00.07.34.50 – НРЗБ).

Сергей Лукашевский: То есть в отличие от глобализации и интернета, этот фактор влияет различным образом?

Денис Волков: Да, различные условия, по-разному работают институты.

Сергей Лукашевский: Спасибо. Василий?

Василий Жарков: По правде говоря, поскольку я не социолог, то я скорее чувствую себя объектом исследования, и в таком качестве попробую выступить, если позволите. Я откликнулся на эту тему, потому что лично мне она чрезвычайно близка. Я имею наглость себя относить к части этого поколения. Мы с вами об этом говорили в самом начале.

Давайте начнём по этим вопросам, по крайней мере, по первым двум, касающимся транзита и касающимся поколений. Что касается транзита, то, в целом будучи согласным со скепсисом по отношению к этому понятию, я бы хотел добавить. Даже если мы исходим из логики транзита, то мне бросаются в глаза две вещи. Первая вполне вписывается в классический транзитологический подход. Но я начну с другой – с книги Дмитрия Ефимовича Фурмана «Движение по спирали», где он говорит и, на мой взгляд, это абсолютно релевантно, что некоторое движение в сторону ограничения демократических институтов, если мы говорим о транзите в сторону демократии, начинается практически сразу после крушения советской системы. Он датирует это, если не ошибаюсь, 1992 годом. В качестве простого институционального примера, а он приводит разные вещи, связанные с риторикой, скажем, что атмосфера нетерпимости к оппоненту в российских СМИ существует уже на этой стадии, и мы все прекрасно знаем, как это усиливается уже к 1996 году, через 1993 год, естественно, но есть и простые институциональные вещи. Альбац в своей книге «Мина замедленного действия» 1992 года, хотя, фактически, написанной в 1991 году, обращает внимание на то, что архивы КГБ были закрыты уже в конце 1991 года. Это мелкая вещь, которая, казалось бы, не имеет большого значения на фоне того, что мы видим, меняются флаги, небывалый (вроде бы) подъём свободы, и так далее, но вот такая мелочь, такой шаг создаёт то, что можно было бы назвать… Это к вопросу о поколении – я подумал, а кто я в этом поколении? И что я делал эти последние двадцать три года? Крушение СССР – это мои восемнадцать лет. Я шёл по беговой дорожке. Я всё время двигался вперёд, и довольно много усилий сделал для того, чтобы двигаться вперёд. Я развивал какие-то мышцы, но всё время что-то подо мной двигалось назад. Постепенно, сначала – медленнее, потом – быстрее. Такое со мной однажды было в фитнес-клубе, куда я хожу – дорожка стала так быстро бежать, что мне пришлось подскочить, чтобы не упасть и не сломать ноги. Сегодня я вишу над этой дорожкой и думал – либо я сломаю ноги, либо мне надо соскакивать куда-то. Если вы позволите здесь позволите такую метафору! Возвращаясь к транзиту, то он произошёл довольно быстро, где-то между 1987-1991 годом. Этот транзит для меня был подарком на День рождения. Мне его просто подарили, ведь я не приложил никаких усилий – это переход к тому, что есть поколение транзита. Другой подход: подход Габриэля Алмонда. Мы можем выделить различные типы политических культур и связанных с ними политических систем. СССР по Алмонду относился к авторитарной индустриальной модели. Что, наверное, справедливо. Но расчет мой, расчет людей, которые все эти годы поддерживают демократические реформы был, возможно, связан с тем, что мы движемся из авторитарно-индустриальной модели в некую демократически-индустриальную, или постиндустриальную. Но то, что мы видим, например, по уровню политического участия, тут я позволю сослаться на известные данные Левада-центра, а ранее – ВЦИОМ, потому что, по-моему, кроме ВЦИОМа и Левада-центра этим в России вообще никто всерьёз не занимался, – уровень политического участия у нас невысок и он ближе к развивающимся авторитарным моделям. И то, где мы сегодня оказались, это, условно, Египет, это ситуация страны третьего мира, которая имеет авторитарный, типичный для страны такого типа стран режим. Правда, с некоторым отставанием от Индонезии лет на тридцать. Но вполне релевантный современному Египту, хотя с другой демографией. Это разочарование, безусловно. Но, может быть, в такой оптике на это тоже можно посмотреть.

Теперь о поколении. Я точно так же, как вы, рассуждал бы год или два назад. Даже ещё год назад я так рассуждал. Мои студенты – это поколение моих возможных детей, дети рождения 1997-1998 годов. У моих сверстников есть такие дети таких годов рождения. Фактически, дети. Удивительная вещь: в тот момент, когда мы оказались над этим тренажёром, а, на мой взгляд, в итоге мы оказались опять где-то там, то ли в 1984, то ли 1983 году, то ли где-то ещё. Пожалуй, вчера я это окончательно осознал на одном из занятий нового учебного года. Мы с этими детьми – абсолютно советские люди. Мы ведём себя так в ряде случаев. Например, надо пошутить, а мы находимся в президентской Академии. Как-то так пошутить, чтобы никому… Раньше я это плохо знал, а сейчас оказался в этой ситуации. Я не жалуюсь, просто я вижу, что ряд вещей, например, ТВ-пропаганда, которая вызывает смех, но это смех советской курилки, смех людей, которые ничего при этом не могут изменить. Которые реагируют, в общем, правильно, но остаются при этом милыми советскими людьми. Я это и про себя говорю. Я говорю про ту часть аудитории, которая на это реагирует. Для меня сейчас различия не столько поколенческие, сколько в плане вот этих реакций. Но я добавлю к этому, что ещё хуже, другое. Знаете, я все эти годы берёг себя от излишнего переживания опыта прошлого нашей страны, особенно XX века. Я вынужден в этом признаться. Только сейчас я смотрю фильм «В круге первом». Он вышел в 2006 году, но тогда мне это было не интересно. Я был слишком беспечен и счастлив, чтобы смотреть такие фильмы. Сейчас я смотрю его и понимаю, что всё, что происходит с героями этого фильма, мне абсолютно понятно. Более того, это часть мое повседневной жизни. Это мой опыт этого года. Я не могу сказать, что нечто такое я мог бы сказать год назад. Но сейчас я готов под этим подписаться. Нет поколений. Все эти поколения собраны на краю какой-то пропасти. Ничего хорошего за этой мглой не видно, и они понимают друг друга, потому что всё – то же. Всё известно. И если год назад, когда начались известные события, я вдруг позволил себе сделать занятие о позднем СССР, просто я помнил, и вдруг увидел какой-то интерес у аудитории, то теперь не надо рассказывать – мы все в позднем СССР. Вот об этом я бы хотел сказать. Удивительным образом мы сейчас находимся в той точке. Где различение поколений не столь важно. Мы все в одном месте. И различение сейчас важно не поколенческое, а скорее, ценностное, связанное с вашей позицией в отношении того, где вы сейчас оказались. Да. Внешне вроде похоже на поляков, чехов и немцев. Скажу больше – мой среднестатистический студент ничем внешне не отличается от его немецкого сверстника. Но чем-то отличается. В частности, этим пониманием каких-то странных вещей, которые, казалось бы, для меня ушли в 1991-1992 годах. То, чем я, если позволите, завершу. Какое это поколение – поколение транзита, или поколение ещё чего-то. Если говорить о моём, то это поколение неслыханного счастья, которое происходило лично со мной примерно с того момента, когда я однажды включил в мае 1989 года и увидел там выступающего на Съезде народных депутатов Сахарова. Ну и примерно, если позволите ещё одну дату – 24 сентября 2011 года. Мы помним, что произошло в этот день. Вот это было время беспечного счастья для определённой части людей, которая бежала по беговой дорожке и думала, что движется вперёд. В данном случае я готов поставить многоточие.

Сергей Лукашевский: Спасибо.

Алексей Левинсон: Если воспользоваться словом «транзит» в нашем, российском бытовом смысле, – «транзитом через…», «транзит через что-то запрещён», то я бы сказал, что да, мы имеем дело с поколением транзита. В это поколение я бы включил всё население Российской Федерации, и самых молодых – тоже. Мы побывали, к восторгу некоторых, к ужасу гораздо большего числа людей в некоей ситуации, которую очень условно можно назвать демократией. Мы были ею, так сказать, искушены. Коль скоро всё произошло так, как произошло, этот заход в демократию принёс какое-то количество счастья небольшому числу людей, какое-то количество несчастья большому числу людей. Но он принёс, мне кажется, очень большое несчастье стране как субъекту истории. Боюсь, мы получили прививку от демократии, такую, как не знаю, какая ещё нация получала – мне не приходит в голову историческая параллель. То, что мы знаем о мнениях публики (при этом возраст тут как раз совершенно ничего не значит), то там можно найти свои двадцать пять процентов, или сколько, в разное время – разное количество, но в любом случае, основательное меньшинство, которое более или менее согласится с тем, что мы тут говорим. И всё. А для остальных это проклятые времена, куда нас завели, а кто завёл, это не важно. Самая важная аналогия с прививкой вот в чём: сейчас обращаться к нашим жителям с демократической повесткой или с демократической проповедью бессмысленно. На это следует ответ – мы всё знаем. И они действительно это всё знают. Начинаю рассказывать про права человека, они говорят – мы слыхали. Про Сахарова – слыхали. Про ГУЛАг – да, был ГУЛАГ. Ну и так далее. Все козырные карты демократической общественности биты. Или как это – сыграны? В общем, их нет. Когда-то я занимался образом Сахарова, что сохранилось от него в молодёжной среде. Могу сказать – почти ничего не сохранилось. Самое главное – то, что можно было назвать Сахаровской парадигмой, что Сахаров и иже с ним внесли в нашу, российскую жизнь, это действительно внесено. И второй раз это вносить – никто этого не ждёт, а если внести, то некому сервировать эти яства. Ещё раз хочу сказать, что это отравление, это искушение пронизывает всё общество. Те, кто сами побывали в лихих 90-х, сейчас выдумывают (или вспоминают правду), как они тогда страдали от чего-нибудь, и те, кто были рождены позже, и много позже, думают про эти 90-е то же самое, что их родители. Очень хитро устроена эта трансляция, но факт тот, что она есть. Я думаю, что идти нам всё равно надо туда, куда шли, или пытаться двигать страну туда, куда мы шли. Поэтому самое главное, что надо делать нам здесь (перед восточноевропейской демократией такие задачи не стоят, и, полагаю, даже для Украины не стоят) – это придумать новые причины, почему туда надо идти. Нужны новые обещания, что будет, если туда придём. Почему это будет лучше чем то, что сейчас. При том, что, наверное, все здесь знают, только никто не хочет этого принять, но ведь российская публика может сказать, что теперь она счастлива, потому что мы наконец великая держава, и Крым наш.

Василий Жарков: И либералы уличены (?).

Алексей Левинсон: Ну да, это как грязь убрали. Поэтому с чем к ним обратиться, к этим столь счастливым людям, я не знаю. В этом смысле мы, конечно, от наших соседей к западу отличаемся очень сильно. От наших соседей к востоку мы отличаемся тоже сильно, разве что кроме Киргизии, которая чем-то искушалась. По-моему, больше не о ком говорить. Китай идёт совсем другой дорогой. Корея – тоже другой дорогой. В этом смысле мы на этих путях – такие сиротки-одиночки. Но никто не плачет.

Любовь Борусяк: Я почти полностью согласна с Алексеем. Единственное, что я хочу ему сказать – это что в некоторых восточноевропейских странах соцлагеря тоже очень непросто. В Венгрии, например. Я лично знакома с молодым человеком, диссидентом, который пишет свои либеральные идеи из Америки, и не очень может возвратиться в Венгрию. Там сейчас настроения тоже не то чтобы были направлены в сторону демократического транзита.

Мне кажется, что всё-таки транзит предполагает некое движение к какой-то цели. Я уверена, что к 1995 году, в котором это стало видно, в частности, по СМИ, идея движения по направлению к демократии тем путём, которым мы шли, была исчерпана. Я неоднократно писала о том, что вдруг на всех каналах, не сговариваясь, стали показывать кино сталинского времени, имевшее огромный успех, в том числе и у молодёжи. Та молодёжь двадцать лет назад – это те, кого вы в рамках поколения транзита и назвали. Вдруг оказались реабилитированы все эти «Кубанские казаки», и аудитория у этого кино вдруг стала молодой. Идейно очень востребованными оказались те направления, которые ещё несколько лет до этого, казалось, полностью себя исчерпали и полностью не соответствовали, даже противоречили заявленному движению. И ещё какое-то время про демократию и движение в этом направлении говорили, и говорили довольно долго, но это было уже движение по инерции.

В письме было заявлено, что это условное транзитное, переходное поколение – 1975-1985 годов рождения. Это довольно сильно различающиеся между собой возраста, хотя бы потому, что рождённые в 1975 году ещё писали «Советский Союз» с больших букв в обоих словах. Те же, кто родились в 1985, стопроцентно пишут второе слово с маленькой. Это для них уже нечто совершенно чужое. Но, как выяснилось, у нас чрезвычайно сильна межпоколенческая трансляция. Мне довелось опрашивать своих студентов, готовился материал к двадцатипятилетию «Мемориала». И вдруг выяснилось, что современные, продвинутые, образованные молодые люди, для которых поездки в Европу, одежда, кино, сериалы – всё это быт, но абсолютное большинство их говорили мне: а вот бабушка говорила, что при Сталине жили хорошо… И вот это слово – бабушка – встречалось у семидесяти процентов всех ответов. Это показывало, что есть для них ценности, хотя очень многое для них направлено на Запад, направлено не то чтобы вперёд, но вроде бы не в том направлении, куда мы идём. Глубинная ценностная структура во многом ещё оттуда, она, уйдя для значительной части людей на короткое время, очень быстро вернулась. И в этом смысле говорить про транзит было бы, наверное, странно. Но мне кажется, что-то транзитоподобное начало появляться совсем недавно. Была идея западной демократии, потом что-то такое аморфное, по образу и уровню жизни мы хотим, чтобы было как у них, а вот на идейном уровне – непонятно как. И вдруг появились заявления, которые мы сейчас слышим, что наше движение в идейном плане должно идти с учётом, прежде всего, нашего прошлого. А одеты мы должны быть во всё самое богатое и красивое. Ценность прошлого как идейное направление оказалась довольно сильно востребована. Я это вижу по молодёжи, они внятно пишут об этом в своих работах. Они отличаются от своих родителей тем, что пока не боятся писать и про то, и про другое. Пока у них такого страха нет, в этом смысле они сильно отличаются от поколения родителей. Они чувствуют право быть и такими, и такими, и какими угодно, и их точки зрения имеют одинаковую ценность.

Насчёт движения: интересно, как выстраивается коммуникация с теми, кто жил раньше. Для современных молодых, а с молодыми я работаю уже пятнадцать лет, и ко мне попадали и те, кого относят к поколению транзита. и те, кто родился позже, неизменно для них ценности родителей и их понимание жизни устарело. Они ощущают себя как другие, гораздо более успешные. Вот это ощущение успеха довольно сильно у молодых. Этот успех воспринимается как нечто непреложное и несвязанное с тем, что происходит вокруг. Вы помните, были такие дискуссии о том, что условно называли средним классом. Вот они все считают, что да, что стандарты их жизни такие, и что в этом смысле они гораздо успешнее, лучше знают жизнь, чем их родители. А родителям в этом мешало всё – их советское прошлое, и, особенно, их прошлое «лихих 90-х». Очень редко какой термин так легко приживается. «Белые ночи», сказал товарищ Достоевский, и се увидели, что они белые. Сказали, что 90-е – лихие, и все их считают лихими. В этом смысле молодёжь оставили движение в прошлом, своим родителям, многие из которых тогда пострадали, вынуждены были искать другую деятельность. А у большинства их них есть впереди перспективы материального благополучия и успеха. Можно ли увидеть в этом вектор движения – я его особенно не вижу. Но ориентация такая есть, есть противопоставление тем, кто жил до них. То есть они ещё вместе живут, но ощущают себя другим поколением.

Сергей Лукашевский: Спасибо. Я, пожалуй, тоже выскажусь с точки зрения не столько исследования, сколько собственного опыта и понимания. Мне кажется, что ещё в начале 2000-х годов был такой опыт: какая-то западная организация попросила написать про децентрализацию и права человека в России. Разбираясь и копаясь в этом материале, мне уже на тот момент стало очевидно, что происходящее у нас правильнее описывать не транзитом к чему-то, а процессом распада империи и ситуации постраспада. и что доминирует не вопрос, куда идём и как идём, а ситуации, когда всё развалилось, а мы хоть что-то строим. Я хотел бы предложить свою аллегорию. Вы, Василий, говорили про дорожку, которая куда-то бежала, а потом стала бежать так быстро и в противоположную сторону, что появился страх сломать ноги. У меня было ощущение, что каждый начал строить свой сад. Это звучит красиво, но у кого-то это был действительно сад, а у кого-то – довольно жёсткое, агрессивное пространство. Если до какого-то момента казалось, что всё как-то сбалансируется, и действительно могут расцвести сто цветов, и куда-то это выплывет, то в чём-то с начала 2000-х, но точно – к середине десятилетия появилось ощущение, что нет, на твой сад наползают окружающие джунгли, всё больше, и скоро поглотят его целиком.

Что касается различий. Конечно, для Центральной, Южной и Восточной Европы огромную роль играло вхождение в Евросоюз, не как политическое событие, а как возвращение в Европу. Мы возвращаемся в Европу! В Польше, в которой я много был и много знаю, там даже описывалась эта ситуация. Электоральная ситуация описывалась так: если до этого наши либеральные партии говорили, как хорошо, что мы теперь в Евросоюзе и включаемся в (00.37.27 – НРЗБ) другую Европу, то теперь, как рассказывают мои друзья, пришло на выборы новое поколение, которое всю свою социально-сознательную жизнь живёт в Европе, и им не интересны эти доводы. Ну и что, что мы в Европе? Мы уже давно в ней. Предъявите нам что-нибудь новое, какие-нибудь новые горизонты! И эти процессы определяют их общественную и политическую жизнь. У нас этого момента не было вовсе. В нашем обществе, и в том числе – молодого поколения, есть высокая степень имморализма, о котором всё время говорит Лев гудков и, по-моему, это присутствует и в других текстах Левада-центра. И высокая степень агрессии. У меня такое ощущение, что это готовность агрессивно относиться к миру. В начале, опять же, 2000-х годов я участвовал в некотором количестве исследований по поводу хейт-спич, языка вражды в России. Так вот, моим очень важным наблюдением было то, что этот язык вражды в наиболее массовом своём распространении не имеет какого-то специального адресата, которого специально не любят. Понятно, что была мигрантофобия, кавказофобия и так далее, но в целом это было некое марево готовности разговаривать агрессивной, жёсткой, унижающей лексикой. Даже часто не замечая этого факта, не отдавая себе отчёта. В этом, как мне кажется, тои есть отличие. Я согласен с тем, что транзит захватил все поколения, но если всё-таки сравнивать конкретные генерации, то это то, что отличает от их сверстников в Центральной и Восточной Европе. Кстати, к вопросу о либеральных ценностях, о сравнении нас с другими странами с похожими режимами. Это тоже банальная вещь, которая много раз проговаривалась: уровень индивидуализма, отсутствие коммунальных ценностей и вообще ценностей единства и солидарности. Если сравнить, например, киевский Майдан с нашими протестами на Болотной площади, то у нас каждый раз договаривались ни на кого из участников не агрессировать. Эта договорённость, что мы вместе, каждый раз как бы обновлялась даже тут, даже в этом пространстве. А на Майдане не было этого ощущения. Там было ощущение максимального собирания всех воедино. Радостного собирания, не готовности терпеть анархистов, коммунистов, националистов. а радостного собирания всех. Вы все против этой банды Януковича, так придите к нам, мы вам всем рады. Кто бы вы не были, какой национальности, какого вероисповедания, каких политических взглядов. Против – мы вам рады!

Ещё одно моё наблюдение. Хотя я по рождению, 1975 год, отношусь к тому самому поколению, которое сознательно застало советское время, и прожил 90-е, я могу судить скорее о тех, кто меня сильно младше. У меня, наоборот, такое ощущение, что они ничего не знают, и настоящий советский опыт им, в действительности, не доступен. У них нет ощущения этого времени. Вот здесь, наверное, пролегает довольно серьёзная граница между людьми, которые реально помнят, как это было, и людьми, которые не помнят. И межпоколенческая передача здесь работает как-то иначе, на другие ценности.

Любовь Борусяк: Можно поспорить? Дело в том, что говорить о том, что помнят – это вопрос сложный. Многое из того, что воспринималось как жизнь, потом было переосмыслено. Сейчас уже помнят то, что считают нужным помнить. И в этом смысле говорить, что-де я человек с большим опытом советской жизни, или – люди моего поколения, – и что мы одинаково опишем эту реальность, в которой мы жили, и одинаково расскажем своим детям, а у кого есть, и внукам, – нет! Потому что мы передаём некий сгусток представлений, в основном групповых, неиндивидуальных, потому что те бабушки, которые говорят, что зато жизнь тогда была дешёвая, а потом стала дорогой, и даже в позднесоветское всё было в магазинах – не значит, что всё это было. Мы вспоминаем всегда некий образ, и нельзя сказать, что это всегда помнится и транслируется точный жизненный опыт. Мы помним то, что хотим помнить и забываем то, что принято забывать.

Алексей Левинсон: Простите, я хочу сказать то же самое немного по-другому. Я не знаю, возможно, есть такие общества, где есть истинная память, что-то знают и это передают. Но я твёрдо уверен в том, что в нынешнем российском обществе люди, которые жили при советской власти и люди, которые при ней не жили, думают о ней совершенно одно и то же. Создан миф, вернее, мы имеем дело с двумя мифами. Первый – миф о Золотом веке брежневской эпохи Советского Союза. Второй – миф об ужасах перестройки и лихих 90-х. И выйти за пределы этого мифа – это подвиг, это индивидуальные действия. Мы можем позволить себе в этом кругу. Можно написать мемуары, и там всё будет очень точно. Но эти мемуары уйдут в никуда. Лилиана Лунгина написала мемуары, они прозвучали – и всё.

Любовь Борусяк: Нет, принимается и отвергается то, на что есть установки, к чему есть готовность. И про свою жизнь – тоже. Ну подвигом всё же не решусь назвать, хотя, как говорилось в фильме «Тот самый Мюнхгаузен», «что-то героическое в этом есть».

Василий Жарков: Я совершенно согласен с тем, что память – это совершенно не то, что было на самом деле. Но я бы хотел с вами, с одной стороны, в чём-то согласиться, а с другой стороны, поспорить. Мы с вами принадлежим точно к одному поколению, потому что я родился в 1974 году, но учился с людьми 1975 года рождения. Мы с вами принадлежим к первому советскому поколению школьников, которым не нужна была характеристика комсомола для поступления в университет. Это просто институциональное решение, которое произошло именно тогда. Предыдущий класс ещё должен был получать эту характеристику, а мы с вами – уже нет. Я отлично помню, что воспринимал это как большое счастье, и эта институциональная вещь способствовала моему свободомыслию. К чему я это говорю? Есть, с одной стороны, декларируемая память про то, что было, и как было хорошо или плохо. А с другой стороны, есть практики. Есть какие-то поведенческие вещи, которые, к сожалению, воспроизводятся. Я позволю себе привести один пример, не ссылаясь на источник, чтобы быть корректным. Есть, условно говоря, молодёжная газета. Даже назовём её newsletter, так, как будто бы транзит у нас полностью произошёл. Они так сами называют – newsletter. Это корпоративная газета высшего учебного заведения, очень интеллигентные дети, вполне себе свободомыслящие, прочитавшие западной литературы гораздо больше, чем их сверстники в СССР. Я читаю этот newsletter. И что он мне напоминает? Он мне напоминает хорошую вольнодумную редакцию времён Перестройки, но ещё цензуры, когда очень хорошие, всё понимающие люди пишут так, чтобы, с одной стороны, ни в коем случае не изменить собственной совести, но в то же время не попасть под окрик начальства. Вот откуда это берётся, из какой памяти? Опять же, можно совершенно чётко увидеть, что у этой газеты есть шеф-редактор, профессиональный журналист, примерно 60-го года рождения, которая всему этому их прекрасно научила. Не важно, что они думают про продукты, были те в СССР или не были. Важно, что они здесь и сейчас воспроизводят советскую практику, может быть, оставаясь абсолютными антисоветчиками (я это точно знаю), не верящими, что в СССР было достаточно продуктов. У них – разные родители и разные бабушки у разных детей. Но эта практика остаётся и никуда не девается, к сожалению. К сожалению, это не позволяет мне сказать о том, что разница между этими поколениями столь существенна.

Любовь Борусяк: Мне ещё хочется добавить буквально одно слово. Алексей говорил о том, что идея самой демократии уже второй раз не продастся. Меня поразило и очень расстроило во время недавних протестных митингов то, какие я услышала там песни. Там во время шествий заводили точно те же песни, что и во время шествий 1990-го года. Прошло более двадцати лет, и я опять слышу Цоя и так далее. Как будто не прошло этих лет.

Алексей Левинсон: Но их действительно не прошло.

Любовь Борусяк: Так вот я и поняла, что дело плохо, потому что они сомкнулись в этот момент и всё, что было внутри, ничего этого нет. Я поняла, что вряд ли что-то получится именно потому, что это было в значительной мере воспроизведением. Многое изменилось по форме, но это – ровно один в один. Так же, как 21 августа 1991 года, когда на концерте в честь победы над ГКЧП исполняли песни те, кто исполнял их на правительственных концертах в 1975 году – Людмила Зыкина и так далее.

Алексей Левинсон: Нет, это не Зыкина пела, это крутили её песни.

Любовь Борусяк: И тем не менее! А в этот день наоборот, отменился, рок-концерт. Это был какой-то первый сигнал, эти песни о многом говорят.

Сергей Лукашевский: Но если развивать этот образ, продолжать про песни, которые крутились в 1990-1991 годах, то надо сказать, что их писали люди более ранних годов рождения. Соответственно, можно сказать, что это «поколение транзита» не смогло ничего принести. То есть мы остались на той же точке, и не только потому, что политические институты никаким образом у нас не улучшились, но даже та свободомыслящая часть общества, которая, казалось бы, готова выйти на протесты, она всё равно ничего не привнесла. Поменялись некие внешние формы коммуникации, какие-то стилистические моменты, а содержание не изменилось.

Алексей Левинсон: Сергей, если сегодняшние лидеры протестного движения, в том числе люди, перед которыми надо снять шляпу, потому что это люди, готовые всерьёз платить за свою позицию, платить свободой, если даже они в большинстве совсем на самом деле не знают, что сказать. Они хотят выйти на площадь, а потом оглядываются и спрашивают – что кричать-то?

Любовь Борусяк: Не зря же на митингах все предпочитали шествия и старались не слышать, что там говорят, если это не артист и не телевизионный персонаж. А многие сразу уходили, потому что слушать многим было довольно тяжело.

Алексей Левинсон: Выразить протест, сказать что-то такое, как у Жванецкого – что ж вы, суки, делаете? – на это способны широкие массы. А что-то сказать им нечего. Есть жемчужины вроде «партии жуликов и воров», что идёт в народ, но доктрины нет.

Сергей Лукашевский: То есть никакого нового содержания этим поколением наработано не было.

Алексей Левинсон: Ни этим, ни каким-то другим.

Любовь Борусяк: Ну почему никаким – сначала было наработано, но потом оно транслировалось много-много десятилетий.

Алексей Левинсон: Это поколение, к которому принадлежат мои родители.

Сергей Лукашевский: То есть, условно говоря, поколение Сахарова и его младших современников наработало. Тогда, может быть, нам стоит говорить о потерянном поколении?

Алексей Левинсон: Ну может быть.

Любовь Борусяк: Тогда все поколения потерянные!

Сергей Лукашевский: Ну почему, про, условно говоря, сахаровское поколение я бы так не сказал.

Любовь Борусяк: Нет, следующие.

Василий Жарков: Вечное советское поколение, вечно потерянное. Я абсолютно согласен с тем, что вы сказали, но я поясню, почему я сказал о своём поколении как о поколении полного счастья, чтобы немного изменить смысл этого выражения. Кто совершал транзит 90-х? Я учился в университете, я пытался что-то изменить в себе, и многое меняю до сих пор. Для меня не окончен транзит от советского человека, которого я выдавливаю из себя по капле. С другой стороны, это, действительно, возделывание своего индивидуального сада. Но посмотрите, а кто в моём поколении, в нашем с вами, в том, которое вы обозначили 1975-1985 годами рождения? Кто сейчас (признаем это как факт, нравится нам это или нет) оказался на коне, властителем дум, тиражным публицистом? Захар Прилепин, Сергей Шаргунов, Борис Межуев и известинские колумнисты. То есть люди, которые не только не участвовали в этом транзите, а, наоборот, выступали против него. В чём и сказалась их самость. А мы вслед за шестидесятниками, к сожалению, ничего не предложили. Вот в этом полное счастье беспечности, которое и сейчас сохраняется. 24 сентября прошлого года прошло уже четыре года.

Сергей Лукашевский: Полное счастье может подвигать на творчество, это творческое состояние! Да, у меня ещё была идея про различия. Понятно, что никто из нас не является серьёзным специалистом по Венгрии. Пока одна часть интеллигенции, интеллектуалов предавалась ощущению полного счастья, другая часть развивала те идеи, те концепты, которые в Европе являются сугубо маргинальными и даже часто непристойными. А здесь они как раз активно, творчески развивались, и мы сейчас имеем дело с этим.

Алексей Левинсон: Послушайте, Сергей, Польша, которую вы знаете, там этого тоже полно.

Любовь Борусяк: Я об этом и пыталась сказать, что не всё так просто. А в Болгарии?

Полина Филиппова: В Болгарии у нас есть даже такой выжимка из национального опроса. Они сделали в прошлом, 2014 году, к двадцатипятилетию демократических изменений, опрос на 1200 человек всех возрастов, от шестнадцати лет и старше. И они получили более или менее закономерный результат. Всё, что вы сейчас говорили, я галочками отмечала. 94% тех, кому от шестнадцати до тридцати, не знают ничего или знают очень мало о так называемом транзите. Понятно, о каком транзите в случае Болгарии идёт речь. Поскольку у нас нет русских цифр на этот счёт, я думаю, что болгарские цифры будут довольно любопытны. 40% не знают, какая стена упала. Были варианты: стена в Москве, в Софии, китайская стена и берлинская.

Василий Жарков: В Москве ещё упадёт.

Полина Филиппова: Угадайте, какая победила?

Алексей Левинсон: Китайская?

Полина Филиппова: С большим отрывом победила китайская! И то же про передачу поколений. Среди тех, кто знает про падение коммунизма из книг, из школы или университета, из телевизора – все они суммарно составляют 36%. Остальные знают от бабушки, от дедушки.

Любовь Борусяк: У них тоже есть бабушки.

Алексей Левинсон: Или просто не знают.

Полина Филиппова: Да, или не знают. Соответственно, то, что они знают, напрямую влияет на оценку этого самого транзита.

Любовь Борусяк: Мне кажется, что это очень важно, потому что мы начали с того, что у них всё по-другому.

Полина Филиппова: А внезапно оказывается, что всё точно так же.

Любовь Борусяк: Нет, как раз не внезапно. Видно, что чем дальше, тем больше эти настроения во многих странах усиливаются.

Алексей Левинсон: Господа, всё-таки институты там были созданы и они есть.

Любовь Борусяк: Вадим Волков сделал замечательный доклад на одной из вышкинских конференций. Он показал, что в Польше создан новый институт суда, а работает он точно также, как он работал в советской Польше. Он лепит исключительно обвинительные заключения. Институт сломали, но он воспроизводится. Так же как у нас сломали институт цензуры, а работает он, как часы. Оказывается, институты в наших условиях, советских в широком смысле, могут работать, будучи сломленными, изменёнными и заменёнными.

Алексей Левинсон: Ну это на совести Волкова – считать, что польская судебная система такая же, как российская.

Любовь Борусяк: А он показывал статистику. Нет, не как российская, а как польская …

Сергей Лукашевский: … до транзита.

Любовь Борусяк: Он говорит, что она не изменилась по числу обвинительных приговоров. Он про советскую вообще не говорил. Но было поразительно, что институт сломали, а он оказался живее всех живых.

Денис Волков: Если говорить об этом сравнении, то мне кажется, что для нас здесь, в России было бы правильно посмотреть на опыт других стран. Это было бы полезно. Потому что мы очень часто варимся в собственном соку. Наш особый путь не в том, что мы хотим этот особый путь, а в том, что других особо не знаем.

И ещё два слова я хотел бы сказать в защиту поколения Y. Если посмотреть на протестное движение, посмотреть, как оно организовывалось, потому что оно само по себе, как там у Толстого? Само собой даже кашки утром детям не бывает. Большую роль там сыграли представители этого поколения. Если брать по темам, то во многом, хотя и в сотрудничестве с правозащитниками старших поколений, есть тема защиты поддержки политзаключённых: были созданы организации, такие, как ОВД-инфо, помощь оказавшимся в автозаках, которым предоставляют адвокатов, это предложил Кац; РосУзник, был создан Комитет 6 мая. если посмотреть, кто туда входил, а входили разные люди, но костяк, всё-таки, это молодые люди. И ОккупайАбай, там не только Навальный повёл, а были люди, которые думали, как это устроить. И устроили, использовав сложившуюся мобилизацию. Это люди, которые знали, что такое твиттер, что такое фейсбук, как работают новые коммуникации, как их инновационно использовать. Как построена информация об автозаках – на смс, на онлайн-отслеживании, на публикации информации в общедоступном интернете. Можно говорить и о других проектах, о благотворительности.

Любовь Борусяк: Даже наблюдатели на выборах – это в основном молодёжь.

Денис Волков: Да, задумывалось это как неполитический проект, но задумывался-то он не политиками, которые входили в движение «Солидарность» – не Немцовым, не Касьяновым, а именно молодыми людьми. И это выстрелило. Хотя не их заслуга, что это сыграло, условия так сложились. Но готовили, провели эту работу в основном молодые люди, то самое поколение Y. Если возвращаться к проекту, то надо выбросить понятие транзита, чтобы никого не смущать. Во всём мире серьёзные исследователи уже отказались от него, а мы всё сидим и мусолим. Оно было хорошо для 90-х годов, когда он произошёл. А потом, когда стало понятно, что никакого транзита так и не случилось, для большинства, за пределами европейских институтов, не тех, кто хотел присоединиться или присоединился к Европейскому союзу. У тех был транзит, по крайней мере в том смысле, что была поставлена цель присоединения к Евросоюзу. Вот если это понятие отбросить, то вполне можно сравнивать, смотреть. Я вернусь к тому, что уже сказал, возможно, не очень правильно и ясно: в каких-то базовых неполитических вещах, например, московская университетская молодёжь, более образованная, будет иметь больше общего с польской университетской молодёжью, чем с другими своими ровесниками, и больше тем для разговоров. Но политические институты, которые имеют другую логику, другое время, как говорил Левада, которые остались менее реформированными, деформируют эти политические предпочтения молодого поколения – через пропаганду, через давление, через барьеры в карьере. И не только они. А на Западе это иные институты – ценность Европы, ценность демократии, переосмысление прошлого, это всё встроено в государственные институты и в систему образования. Если говорить об этом, смотреть, как это работает, сравнивать, говорить друг другу – это было бы очень интересно. и полезно.

Сергей Лукашевский: Я правильно понимаю, что вы предлагаете отделить те характеристики, которые связаны с политическими институтами, от тех ценностей, которые, условно говоря, связаны с образом жизни?

Денис Волков: Нет, я просто говорю, что они другие. Одни будут очень похожи, другие – нет. Их можно разделить и сравнивать, объяснять.

Сергей Лукашевский: То есть, говоря об исходных гипотезах, одна из них состоит в том, что там, где мы сравниваем политические ценности, ценности, связанные с институтами…

Денис Волков: Не только ценности – все структуры.

Сергей Лукашевский: … способы поведения будут противоположными. А в том, что связано с образом жизни, будет совпадение. Какой-то похожий опыт, и можно попытаться этот опыт вычленить и сформулировать, в том числе на языке ценностей.

Денис Волков: Во многих европейских странах, где произошёл транзит, он произошёл не до конца, он во многом не доделан, работает не так.

Любовь Борусяк: Где-то работает в другую сторону.

Василий Жарков: Тут многочисленные вариации.

Полина Филиппова: Не могу не вклиниться опять со своим болгарским опытом, потому что у них был вопрос, который повторял аналогичный из опросника сразу после 1989 года, то есть после падения коммунистического режима. Это был вопрос об ожиданиях, что будет дальше, чего хотят люди. Тогда, понятно, хотели открытых границ, благосостояния, развития рынка, новых (01.06.38 – НРЗБ), повышения качества прав и свобод и возвращения частной собственности. И самым последним пунктом 15% опрошенных просили свободных выборов. И вот наши болгарские коллеги пишут, что, хотя объективно против многих из этих ожиданий можно поставить галочку, так как Болгария – член НАТО и Евросоюза, у болгар есть свободное передвижение и частная собственность, и даже многопартийная система и свободные выборы, но субъективно только три пункта люди согласны отметить как выполненные. Это вхождение в Европу, свобода передвижение и частная собственность. А всё остальное из списка, который я только что перечислила, только 2, 5 или 10% подтверждают как совершившиеся. 2% респондентов говорят, что сбылись их ожидания о справедливом суде, 5% считают, что в Болгарии есть демократические институты, и 10% говорят, что там есть свободные выборы. То есть очень маленький процент.

Алексей Левинсон: Они не верят, что их выборы свободны?

Полина Филиппова: Только 10% считают, что в Болгария получила свободные выборы.

Алексей Левинсон: Денис, а можно то, что вы говорили, пересказать следующим образом. Если говорить о различии культурного и социального, то в области культурного – значительные трансформации, и, используя термин Сахарова, конвергенция, а у социальности судьба совсем другая.

Денис Волков: Мне кажется, что скорее в политике, в политической сфере не было предложено. Не только на уровне федеральном, который был блокирован, но, во многом, и политика на уровне оппозиции тоже была блокирована для новых людей. Там те же кубы, которые навязли у всех на зубах. По-моему, не сам Навальный их предлагал.

Алексей Левинсон: Вы говорите всё-таки о символической сфере, где много новаций, и грех их не замечать. Тогда я предложу другое разделение: если разделить на приватное и публичное вообще нашу жизнь и ту историю, которую мы успели повидать своими глазами, то можно заметить, что в сфере приватного жизнь нашей страны развивалась и развивается динамично, более или менее приемлемо. По крайней мере, тех мерзопакостей, которые совершаются в публичных пространствах, в приватной сфере нет. У нас уходит в приватную сферу то, что должно было бы развиваться публично, но не может. Так у нас родился бизнес, он родился на уровне человеческих взаимоотношений, родственных или соседских, и очень долго был вынужден там сидеть, не выходя на поверхность. А как у нас люди выходили на Болотную площадь? Через знакомства. Ты – мне, я – тебе, а технически – твиттер или что, он всё равно обслуживал знакомых друг другу людей.

Денис Волков: Через рекламу на Эхо Москвы. Оплаченную.

Алексей Левинсон: Да-да. Оплаченную. Я думаю, что роль этой оплаченной рекламы очень невелика. Если вы помните, что получалось из наших опросов.

Денис Волков: Если говорить об ОккупайАбае, как он формировался, пришли не десятки, а сотни после сказанного на Эхе Москвы, что-де мы там, приходите, люди узнали и пришли.

Любовь Борусяк: А потом тысячи начали ходить и смотреть, как они там живут.

Алексей Левинсон: ОккупайАбай, как и все другие движения Оккупай, если уж на то пошло, чем оно сильно? Оно демонстрировало политические универсалистские требования, но одновременно и демонстрировало жизнь в палатках компаниями, как в турпоходе, переводя это на уровень первичных отношений. И когда-то это было очень сильным ходом. Не демонстрация рабочих с красными знамёнами, которая и есть политическое действие, а вот такое неполитическое действие с политическим смыслом.

Любовь Борусяк: А антиглобалистские лагеря Оккупай, они же похожим образом образовывались.

Алексей Левинсон: Конечно, наш Окупай не первичен. Но я хочу сказать, что у нас в эту первичную область… А как люди пошли тушить пожары? Масса вещей, которыми можно гордиться, и действий, за которые надо быть благодарными этим людям, сделаны потому, что известно: государство, оно же есть сфера публичного, не может и не будет делать. Поэтому мы это сделаем как частные лица. И если говорить о нашей стране как о стране частных лиц, то ей вполне можно гордиться. А как к стране не частных лиц, тут у меня большие сложности.

Любовь Борусяк: Мне ещё хотелось вот про какую институцию сказать, по поводу протестов. Это институт школы. Как в советское время возникли некоторые школы – источники вольнодумства, так в день одного из митингов оказалось, что очень многие знакомы – это были выпускники определённых школ.

Алексей Левинсон: Ну не все.

Любовь Борусяк: Но был очень высокий процент их.

Алексей Левинсон: Ну хорошо, 57-я школа была.

Любовь Борусяк: А 43-я просто провела встречу выпускников на этом митинге, потому что не разрешили в этот день проводить встречи. И такого было очень много. И многие из них – это дети тех, кто выступал в 1990-1991 годах.

Алексей Левинсон: Транзитники.

Любовь Борусяк: Да, транзитники!

Сергей Лукашевский: Так вот, мне бы хотелось, поскольку мы явно движемся к завершению разговора, попросить вас предложить какие-то формы или, может быть, темы, с помощью которых мы могли бы то нащупование, которое мы сейчас проделали в разговоре, сделать более чётким, более осязаемым. Что бы это могло быть?

Алексей Левинсон: Мне кажется, почин Дениса был очень хорошим.

Любовь Борусяк: Мне тоже так кажется. Сам транзит (01.15.04 – НРЗБ).

Алексей Левинсон: Денис, вам сейчас это придётся сформулировать.

Денис Волков: Надо подумать, на что, собственно, партнёры готовы, что они хотят.

Сергей Лукашевский: Нет, что возможно, что бы было хорошо. Исключая, разве что, какого-нибудь массового опроса пяти тысяч человек.

Денис Волков: Можно хотя бы тысячу человек опросить. Или пятьсот.

Сергей Лукашевский: То есть это было бы хорошо?

Денис Волков: Да. Но уже есть данные ранее проведённых опросов. И нашим центром, и в рамках международных исследований. Мы можем взять и сравнить их. Но мне кажется, и об этом всегда говорят старшие коллеги, что просто ставить в столбик данные разных стран, не говоря о контексте, не разбираясь, что в этих странах происходит, это бесполезно. Поэтому, если можно брать похожие данные, но если каждая команда потом производит анализ и предъявляет друг другу данные, то здорово, можно провести новый опрос.

Сергей Лукашевский: А в целом, какова представляется степень накопленного материала, который можно анализировать?

Денис Волков: Мне кажется, всё уже давно примерно понятно.

Любовь Борусяк: Весь их материал практически об этом, выпущено сто толстенных книжных томов.

Алексей Левинсон: Мне кажется, если эта инициатива как-то к нам относится, то нам надо решать собственные задачи. А наши задачи – это не проблема транзита, по многим причинам, в том числе потому, что это уже давно прожито. У нас есть о чём думать и о чём заботиться. Для нашей страны есть уже совершенно другая проблематика. Сейчас надо смотреть во все глаза, как сдвинулась наша страна. Крым – это просто одно из событий, одно из проявлений тектонического характера, которые начинаются сейчас. И даже сама недвижимость, застылость, подобное подоспевшему, вспухшему тесту, ни во что пока не превратившемуся – это вещи, за которыми надо внимательнейшим образом следить. И если данная инициатива нас к этому подвигает, то хорошо; например, надо смотреть, что в этот момент происходит с молодыми людьми. Если идея транзита – это идея некоего движения, откуда-нибудь в куда-нибудь, то надо смотреть, какое движении есть сейчас и будет. Есть движение эмиграции, вымывания из страны многих ценных людей.

Любовь Борусяк: Уехали как раз многие из тех, кто были на митингах.

Алексей Левинсон: Да, и что происходит с обществом, которое потеряло этих людей? Оно возмещает потерю или не возмещает? Сергей, давайте мы придумаем, какие у нас есть вопросы, на которые нет ответов? тут мы могли бы разработать что-то новое.

Любовь Борусяк: Предлагаю свою помощь – у меня сто сорок студентов, я могу попросить их подробно описать что угодно.

Сергей Лукашевский: Но это если мы говорим о тех, кто молоды сейчас. Но всё-таки исходная тема иная.

Алексей Левинсон: Они уже побывали молодыми.

Любовь Борусяк: Но ещё не всё кончено.

Василий Жарков: Если позволите, то если и не в академических рамках, но из тех материалов, которые интересны, на мой взгляд, как источник по истории поколений транзита, это книга «Революция Гайдара» Альфреда Коха. Это одна из самых интересных книг, которые вышли в эти мрачные времена. Эта книга состоит из интервью, сделанных особым образом: участники брали их у участников. Люди, которые входили в команду Гайдара брали интервью у других членов команды. На мой взгляд, это бесценная вещь. Если что-то интересное и это останется, когда будет следующий подход, а он когда-нибудь обязательно будет, возможно, когда мы будем дедушками и бабушками, и будем рассказывать что надо про 90-е годы. Вот какая история: надо включить и это момент, качественный, потому что цифры цифрами, а что менялось, и как менялось, какая была identity. Ведь сегодня мы говорили, во многом, про идентичность. Поколение транзита, или поколение ещё чего-то иного. Или тут надо применить какое-то другое слово, которое, кстати, присутствует в этих интервью. Я думаю, что это было бы тоже уместно.

Сергей Лукашевский: Да, идентичность – хорошее слово. А насколько осмысленным было бы говорить и пытаться понять о новом содержании? Принесло ли это поколение новое содержание? И если да, то какое? Возможно ли ставить вопрос таким образом? В ходе беседы мне показалось, что был нащупан вот этот очень важный момент.

Алексей Левинсон: Это хороший вопрос.

Любовь Борусяк: Я пытаюсь подумать, реально ли об этом поколении надо говорить.

Алексей Левинсон: Да, я думаю, что спрашивать надо молодых. Если принесло – то кому?

Любовь Борусяк: Да, потому что с тех нечего уже спрашивать.

Алексей Левинсон: И мне кажется, что мы все можем это делать разными способами. Ты это можешь делать своими, мы тоже что-то можем сделать.

Любовь Борусяк: Да, у меня в этом году возможностей много.

Сергей Лукашевский: Ситуация такова, что есть возможность выдвигать свои идеи, а дальше, если эта идея покажется привлекательной всем участникам проекта… Мне кажется, что в этой ситуации поиск ресурсов – дело второе. Главное – чтобы идея была действительно интересной.

Алексей Левинсон: Не значит ли это, что мы пришли к тому, что хотим узнать, что же нынешним людям, которых мы определяем как молодых, дали те, кто их старше? Что они считают не просто наличествующим, как воздух, климат, а именно даденным?

Любовь Борусяк: Как багаж, наследство.

Алексей Левинсон: Да, кто-то им дал. Ощущается ли это именно как даденное? Или это ощущается как наличествующее? Или им чего-то не дали, должны были дать, но не дали!

Любовь Борусяк: Или чего-то сами не взяли. Или пытались дать, а они не захотели.

Алексей Левинсон: Да, или принесли что-то и отравили нам души.

Любовь Борусяк: Если исследовать конкретно, чем недовольны все дети своими условными, символическими родителями.

Алексей Левинсон: Ну мы не Фрейд.

Любовь Борусяк: На самом деле, мы все поколение транзита, потому что мы все прошли этот порог.

Сергей Лукашевский: То есть нынешняя молодёжь живёт в мире, который был если не построен, то сохранён из некоего предыдущего состояния предшествующем поколением.

Алексей Левинсон: А он так думают или нет? Давайте спросим их.

Сергей Лукашевский: Да, я и пытаюсь доформулировать. И что это за мир – ценностный, идейный, материальный, институциональный, который они видят вокруг себя, и как они к нему относятся.

Любовь Борусяк: В общем-то, относятся хорошо.

Сергей Лукашевский: Это хорошая гипотеза.

Любовь Борусяк: Это жизненный опыт.