Stanislav Kuvaldin: “It was the time when many roles seized to exist”

“I think that I began to think profoundly about the 90s was several years ago. I feel that I don’t have nothing that was garanteed for sure in the 90s. As I remember in the time of the 90s I remember them rather negatively. But the reality around me was something…well it was the best period for all of us. But now I fell I missed the feeling of carnival. That was the time about. It was the time when many roles seized to exist. So you can do something you want. There were no more moral strict restrictions. A kind of mentorship. So I think it was a great asset for our generation to feel independently. Several years ago I noticed that our reality is now defined by other values.”

Stanislav Kuvaldin, Journalist, Russia

At a conference in Thessaloniki in October 2015, we asked participants from Eastern and South-eastern Europe about their “Transition Moment”. Could they tell us a little story of a moment, when they realised that something was changing fundamentally in the early 90s.

 

 

Aleksandra: “Now our vote was counting”

“I was still young when it was 1989 and after. But I remember that earlier it was not right to say what you really thought. So you had to support things that you were not sure of or you pretended to support a statement you really disagreed. And then you had the chance to say what you really wanted to say and to think of your own, to vote in real elections. And your vote is counting. That was something interesting that we could discuss in school whom we really wanted to vote, of course is was the opinion of our parents. But still we were convinced that we wanted to support certain people, a certain president. It was an interesting moment.”

At a conference in Thessaloniki in October 2015, we asked participants from Eastern and South-eastern Europe about their “Transition Moment”. Could they tell us a little story of a moment, when they realised that something was changing fundamentally in the early 90s.

Tengiz Gualli (Akhmedov): “Old documents or database were missing, stolen or burned”

“One significant moment that really changed my life somehow was when I was allowed to change my (Russian) sir name into my original sir name. And I figured out that this was very complicated and very odd. It’s actually not possible because of all these old documents and database, that was somehow the prove of the history were all these people were living, were just burned. Some of them were stolen, some of them were missing. And we didn’t have anything to prove our identity, our roots. Our original surnames were very good and powerful. I mean Georgia would be much different, if all these surnames and identities would remain…”

Tengiz Gualli (Akhmedov),  Analytical Center for Interethnic Cooperation and Consultations, Georgia

At a conference in Thessaloniki in October 2015, we asked participants from Eastern and South-eastern Europe about their “Transition Moment”. Could they tell us a little story of a moment, when they realised that something was changing fundamentally in the early 90s.

 

Marta Sykut: “The change was more natural”

“At the time when the change actually happened I was very little. So I have very few memories from that time. So I think by the time I became more aware the things were already new. I think you could gradually see like more TV channels available and color TV. Toys that you have heard of in TV programs became available. I think it was like this realization from the level of consumption really than any sort of political awareness. Probably around 1991-1992 I have more memories from that time. For me I don’t think there was this visibal change because my parents kept the same jobs they had. I changed schools around that time. From kindergarden I went to elementary school. So I guess the change was more natural. I really didn’t see a sudden difference between what happened and what will happen next.”

Marta Sykut, CEO/Centre for Civic Education, Poland

At a conference in Thessaloniki in October 2015, we asked participants from Eastern and South-eastern Europe about their “Transition Moment”. Could they tell us a little story of a moment, when they realised that something was changing fundamentally in the early 90s.

 

Maryna Minova: “Open borders and international cooperations are possible now”

“When I was a student in the educational system of the Sowjet Union there was one situation. And Belarus was part of the Sowjet Union. And now our Country is an independent state. And there are a lot of changes in our life and in my personal life, too. For example the open borders and international cooperations are possible now. I am a teacher and it is very important for me to cooperate with teachers from different countries. Now it is possible for us. We can find and exchange good examples of educational practice with other teachers. And one of the good examples of educational cooperation is the project between teachers of Georgia, (?) and Russian federation and Belarus on the topic of cultural education and how to develop the students ability to access information from mass media and social network. So I think it’s good and hope for better future.”

Maryna Minova, state educational institution “Academy of postdiploma education”, Republic of Belarus

At a conference in Thessaloniki in October 2015, we asked participants from Eastern and South-eastern Europe about their “Transition Moment”. Could they tell us a little story of a moment, when they realised that something was changing fundamentally in the early 90s.

 

 

Daniela Gologan: “Now it’s more material”

“I realized that something was changing when I went to the lyceum. Because it was a period when US series appeared about boys and girls, about how to dress, about the smartphones, about the relation between girls and boys. In that moment I realized that something has changed. Something is different now. Because when I was a little girl it wasn’t important how you dress and if your smartphone is more expensive than mine. If you had a more expensive smartphone or dresses, I would be your friend. The priorities are very different between the 90s and when I went to the lyceum, which was in 2010. I think it’s globalization, it’s a new thing. Now it’s more material, the feeling, the thinking about other people. It’s more superficial. That was the period when I understood that the people change. The method of thinking changed. That’s a good and bad thing about the West.”

Daniela Gologan, Foreign Policy Association, Moldova

At a conference in Thessaloniki in October 2015, we asked participants from Eastern and South-eastern Europe about their “Transition Moment”. Could they tell us a little story of a moment, when they realised that something was changing fundamentally in the early 90s.

Tatiana Zhurzhenko: “It was a moment of great uncertainty”

“One moment was of course the August putsch in Moscow. And it was a moment of great incertainty. We were very young, we were students and didn’t know how the situation will develop. I think because we were very young we were not very afraid. And the second moment was when Yeltsin shot the Russian parliament. I am from Eastern Ukraine and very close to Russia. We still lived like in the Russian information space at that time. For us it was a moment when it became clear that Perestroika is over. All this kind of utopia of peaceful democratization is over. I still remember watching this on TV, these shocking pictures of tanks shooting the parliament.”

Tatiana Zhurzhenko, Institute for Human Sciences (University of Vienna), Ukraine

At a conference in Thessaloniki in October 2015, we asked participants from Eastern and South-eastern Europe about their “Transition Moment”. Could they tell us a little story of a moment, when they realised that something was changing fundamentally in the early 90s.